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EcoBloggers


EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via James Ross from Journal of Ecology blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    5 days 11 min ago
    Adam Clark (University of Minnesota) has just had his paper accepted in Journal of Ecology. Below, Adam tells us more about his study… Plant communities in the tropical forests of Central and South America are famously diverse, and by some estimates are home to more than a third of all tree species on earth. Two processes… Read the full article.
  • via Chris Grieves from methods.blog (Methods in Ecology and Evolution)
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    5 days 6 hours ago
    Post provided by Carola Gómez-Rodríguez & Alfried P. Vogler Time flies… in the blink of an eye! And even more so in science. The molecular lab work we were used to two decades ago seems like ancient history to today’s … Continue reading → Read the full article.
  • via WildlifeSNPits from WildlifeSNPits
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 week 1 day ago

    Genetic Diversity of Snow Leopards
    Snow leopards (Panthera uncia) are endemic to the Altai, Himalaya, and Tibetan uplifts and adapted to high-altitude environments.  They are currently listed as an endangered species by IUCN.  This new paper investigated genetic diversity of snow leopards across their range.  They found that the cats have low genetic diversity in part due to a population bottleneck ~8,000 years ago.  They also observed that snow leopards in the northern Altai Mountains in Mongolia were genetically differentiated from the southern mountains and that a finer-scale spatial structure existed within each population suggesting limited dispersal.  These results will help inform local conservation efforts of snow leopards across their range.

    Side photo of a snow leopard by...

    Read the full article.
  • via noreply@blogger.com (David Steen) from Living Alongside Wildlife
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 week 1 day ago
    Could you identify this snake for me?I live in central Alabama and me and the kids were out in the woods and saw hazel nuts..I reached down to pick one up and this calmly went over my finger I thought it was a worm at first then realized it wasn't by the way it moved....his head is deep dark black solid top bottom and sides,his body was a light brownish red then last nt turned more of
  • via Jessica Bays from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 week 1 day ago

    The BES garden – Delight in the Dark – is led by a team of leading ecologists and designed by Janina Lileikyte-Jones and Lucy Summers. The garden will spotlight plants that thrive and bloom in gloomy conditions and explain the adaptations that enable them to create wonder without direct light.

    Shade plants have developed a range of beautiful characteristics, many of which gardeners are drawn to. These characteristics, including iridescence and variegation, help plants deal with low light levels. The Delight in the Dark shade garden includes more than 50 species of plants adapted to different kinds of shade, many of which will appeal to gardeners.

    “Shade adaptations such as structural variegation are very beautiful and some, like iridescent plants, are certainly intriguing,” says Dr Ken Thompson of the University of Sheffield, who helped develop the BES garden.

    Some plants that grow in deep shade have a striking and attention-grabbing iridescent blue tinge to...

    Read the full article.
  • via noreply@blogger.com (Caroline Tucker) from The EEB & Flow
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 week 1 day ago
    Sometimes I find myself defending the value of microcosms and model organisms for ecological research. Research systems do not always have to involve a perfect mimicry of nature to provide useful information. A new paper in Evolution is a great example of how microcosms provide information that may not be accessible in any other system, making them a valuable tool in ecological research.

    For example, macroevolutionary hypotheses are generally only testable using observational data. They suffer from the obvious problem that they generally relate to processes of speciation and extinction that occurred millions of years ago. The exception is the case of short generation, fast evolving microcosms, in which experimental macroevolution is actually possible. Which makes them really cool :-) In a new paper, Jiaqui Tan, Xian Yang and Lin Jiang showing that “Species ecological similarity modulates the... Read the full article.
  • from Nature's Confluence
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    1 week 1 day ago
    Mark Schwartz The country is currently fixated on ‘fixing’ healthcare. This has quite clearly been framed, and managed, as bad conflict. Eivdence is in the completely partisan voting, among other things. However, this actually could be a “We’re in this together” sort of problem. Everyone recognizes that health care is expensive; we all want everyone to have good health care; we know that using preventative care saves money in the long run; we all want to be able to afford health care; we all want people to behave responsibly with their health care; we all recognize that this is incredibly complex. However, we also should recognize that the government can’t afford to provide "A" level healthcare for everyone and do other things with tax revenue that we want (e.g., pay for the world’s most expensive military). What we disagree on is how much personal versus governmental responsibility there is in fixing the problem of health care, whether... Read the full article.
  • via Chris Grieves from methods.blog (Methods in Ecology and Evolution)
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 week 2 days ago
    Post Provided by Andrew Martin The Global Pollen Project is a new, online, freely available tool developed to help people identify and disseminate palynological resources. Palynology – the study of pollen grains and other spores – is used across many … Continue reading → Read the full article.
  • via Journal of Applied Ecology from The Applied Ecologist's blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 week 2 days ago
    With Plant Conservation Day in mind, Samantha Dawson’s post discusses characteristics of wetland plants and her new paper, Plant traits of propagule banks and standing vegetation reveal flooding alleviates impacts of agriculture on wetland restoration. Many of the world’s wetlands are highly degraded and they are one of the most threatened types of ecosystems. To attempt […] Read the full article.
  • via PierreMariotte from Journal of Ecology blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 week 2 days ago
    18th of May 2017 is Fascination of Plants Day, an event which was launched under the umbrella of the European Plant Science Organisation (EPSO) to encourage people around the world to celebrate the importance of plant science. As readers of Journal of Ecology, you are probably fascinated by plants (as much as me), so let’s… Read the full article.

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