You are here

EcoBloggers


EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago

    A while back we invited you to ask us anything. Here are our answers to our next two questions, from Johan Argovis and Carlos Trigueros, respectively:

    1. When seeking a faculty position in N. America, is it a disadvantage to hold a Ph.D. from outside N. America or Europe?
    2. What’s the current status of Grime’s CSR theory and r-K selection in ecology? In particular, why is r-K selection regarded as obselete or incorrect?

    Jeremy’s answers:

    1. Good question to which I’m unsure of the answer. I think it probably depends on the rest of your cv. If the rest of your cv (and other application materials) are those of...
    Read the full article.
  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago

    Don’t want to wait on this until next week, because anyone who wants to act on it needs to do so quickly. The GOP tax bill proposes taxing graduate student tuition waivers as income. This would mean that many grad students would be taxed on a nominal total income of >$50,000, meaning that their actual take home pay would no longer be enough to live on.

    Academic scientists are among those best positioned to convey to Congress just how bad an idea this is and how disruptive it would be.

    I emphasize that I’m passing on the news without having dug into the details of the bill myself, so it’s possible I’ve overlooked some crucial details. If I’ve made an error or missed something, I’ll correct the post as needed.


    Filed under: Uncategorized... Read the full article.
  • via EcoEvo@TCD from EcoEvo@TCD
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago

    EcoEvo@TCD is getting a new look – one focused around the work we do here in the School of Natural Sciences at Trinity College Dublin. To get a broad picture of what goes on here at Trinity, we’ve put together some photos that represent a range of research and teaching activities from across the school. Check out the full gallery below:

    ...

    Read the full article.
  • via Brian McGill from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago

    Note from Brian: This is a guest post from Falko Buschke a tenure-track faculty member in South Africa. A while back we had an ask us anything question on perceptions of ecology coming out of developing countries. This post stimulated a lot of discussion and it was suggested to solicit some first person experiences. This post is the second of what I hope will be several on this topic.

    My mind started racing when I was approached to share my experiences as an ecologist from a developing country, South Africa. There were so many things I could write about that I soon became overwhelmed. So, rather than touching on several issues, I will focus on the single biggest obstacle I face as an early career researcher in a developing country.

    But before that, here is a short list...

    Read the full article.
  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago

    A while back we invited you to ask us anything. Here are our answers to our next question, from Pavel Dodonov: should ecological research always be prediction/hypothesis-driven, or should there be more space for descriptive research?

    Jeremy’s answer: The question of whether there should be “more space” for descriptive research does puzzle me a little, because there’s never been more space for it than there is now! It’s never been easier to publish descriptive, hypothesis-free research (or any sort of research). That’s what megajournals like Plos One are for–to publish anything technically sound. And if you just want to get your work out there for others to evaluate for themselves without having to go through peer review, well, that’s what preprint servers...

    Read the full article.
  • via Brian McGill from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago

    Note from Brian: This is a guest post from Pavel Dodonov, a postdoc in Brazil. A while back we had an ask us anything question (from Pavel in fact) on perceptions of ecology coming out of developing countries. This post stimulated a lot of discussion and it was suggested to solicit some first person experiences. This post is the first of what I hope will be several on this topic.

    Brian invited me to write this post on my own “experiences, questions, challenges, opportunities, etc on doing ecology in a developing country”, namely in Brazil, and I gladly accepted. In order to have a more representative view, I also asked some friends about their own impressions; still, it is likely that my post is too optimistic, especially considering that I did all my studies in a university in São Paulo state, which is the...

    Read the full article.
  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago

    Note from Jeremy: This is a guest post from Ann Rasmussen. Thank you to Ann for taking the time to write this post.

    This post is part of our series on non-academic careers for ecologists. Ok, this one’s actually about an academic career. But when most people (including me!) think of academic careers, the first thing they think of is a tenure-track faculty career. So we thought it would be useful to readers to also have some posts on other sorts of academic careers.

    1)Tell us a little bit about yourself. Who are you, what sort of ecology did you do in grad school, and what do you do now?

    I’m Dr. Ann L. Rasmussen (@annlras on Twitter), and I graduated with a PhD in Biology last winter....

    Read the full article.
  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 2 weeks ago

    About 8% of the time. Definitely not more than 25%. For the brief details, read on.

    While compiling data on who was hired for N. American tenure-track asst. professor positions in ecology and allied fields advertised in 2016-17, I noted when a search failed, or apparently failed. Sometimes the chair of the department told me the search failed. Sometimes I inferred it failed because the university put out a press release this fall listing all their new faculty, that didn’t list anyone who could’ve filled the position. Sometimes I inferred it failed because the university is advertising for the same position again this year. As of this writing, out of 235 searches (some of which weren’t filled by ecologists), 19 (8%) failed by these criteria.

    Some of those inferences could be...

    Read the full article.
  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 2 weeks ago

    The starting point for this post is an old remark of statistician Jeff Leek (sorry, can’t find the link just now) that no statistical technique works at scale. He was defending frequentist statistical techniques like P-values and confidence intervals against the accusation that they’re widely misunderstood or misused, and we should therefore use Bayesian approaches instead. Jeff’s counter-argument is that if Bayesian approaches were used as widely as P-values and confidence intervals currently are, they’d be just as widely misunderstood and misused.

    Does that argument generalize? Is it true that any statistical or other scientific technique gets used increasingly badly on average as the number of people using it rises? Or are there some for which the quality of the average application holds steady or even improves as the number of users increases? And are there some techniques for which the quality of the average application declines only...

    Read the full article.
  • via Meghan Duffy from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 2 weeks ago

    Recently, there was a twitter discussion about whether to compress all teaching into one semester. I suspect this discussion is most relevant to folks at research-oriented institutions, since high teaching loads at teaching-oriented institutions often make it impossible to combine all teaching into one semester. Thinking of tenure track faculty at US & Canadian research-oriented institutions, I know several folks who prefer to do all their teaching in one semester. I do all my teaching in one semester right now, but would prefer that it not be arranged that way. So, I’m curious about how much variation there is in preferences, in actual practices, and in reasons for preferences. I could get all fancy and do this as a google form that would allow for cross-tabs, but I’m not sure I’ll have time to do the analyses. So, here...

    Read the full article.

Pages

Powered by Drupal | Theme modified by Naupaka Zimmerman from Danland by Danetsoft | | INNGE is supported through a collaboration with INTECOL