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EcoBloggers


EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via Camilla Morrison-Bell from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
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    4 days 15 hours ago

    The scope of the inquiry will include examining the extent to which the government’s approach to the Arctic is fit for purpose including how its promotion of scientific research and business best practise increases its influence among Arctic States and reduces environmental harm in the region.

    As explained on the EAC inquiry webpages, in 2012, the predecessor Committee recommended that the Government develop an arctic strategy to bring together the UK’s diverse interests in the Arctic. In 2013, the...

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  • via dinoverm from Parasite Ecology
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    4 days 15 hours ago
    Precise definitions are important in science, because I said so (and other better reasons). In parasite ecology, the tricky definitions that students often mix up are things like parasite versus parasitoid and microparasite versus macroparasite. In fact, at least 20 visitors … Continue reading → Read the full article.
  • via colindonihue from Colin Donihue
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    5 days 6 hours ago

    (For email readers: make sure you come to the website so you can see the video. Also, for full screen – which I highly recommend – you might have to click the vimeo button in the lower right to watch it there.)

     

    One of the pieces of equipment I was most eager to try on Redonda was the Mavic Pro drone that we’d brought along to survey vegetation and record a glimpse of just how it looked and felt to be on the island. That goal was very nearly foiled by the knock-you-over wind that never let up over much of the island, but luckily, the western cliff faces (picture below) were fairly protected from the prevailing easterly tradewinds.

    ...

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  • via Terry McGlynn from Small Pond Science
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    5 days 11 hours ago

    The liberal arts are important, people say. I agree. Some of us scientists will point out that science is a part of the liberal arts. Okay, sure. But what do people mean when they say “the liberal arts?”

    I’ve heard the phrase, “the value of a liberal arts education” so often, that the only thing it really means to me anymore is “the price tag of a small liberal arts college.” I think when the phrase is invoked by administrators of liberal arts colleges, it’s easy to imagine that it’s not about the actual education you receive at a liberal arts college, but instead the opportunities that are opened to you as a result of attending such an institution. Because small liberal arts colleges have no monopoly on the liberal arts.

    Whenever someone says “the liberal arts,” I think it that...

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  • via Chris Grieves from methods.blog (Methods in Ecology and Evolution)
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    5 days 12 hours ago
    Today we are welcoming two new people to the Methods in Ecology and Evolution Associate Editor Board. Pierre Durand is joining us from the University of the Witwatersrand (South Africa) and Andrew Mahon joins from Central Michigan University (USA). You can find out more … Continue reading → Read the full article.
  • via jeffollerton from Jeff Ollerton
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    6 days 3 hours ago

    Today Karin and I took a drive up to Birmingham to visit my daughter Ellen, who is studying applied performance and community theatre at Birmingham School of Acting.  After picking her up we went for lunch at Birmingham Botanical Gardens.  Now, I’m a bit of a botanic gardens collector; I love visiting them, and keep a life list of those I’ve visited and a wish list of those I’d like to visit.  So I was sure I had been to the Botanical Gardens as a PhD student during a British Ecological Society conference at the University of Birmingham.  But when we arrived there I had no recollection of the glasshouses or the layout, it was not familiar at all.  Odd how the memory plays tricks, one way or another.

    I can recommend a visit, though – the Gardens looked stunning even this early in the season; lots of plants in flower and even a buzzard circling low overhead.  It...

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  • via dinoverm from Parasite Ecology
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    1 week 1 day ago
    Next week, I’m going to write a post about vectors. This week, I want your input! So tell me: what is a vector? (I took these definitions from the literature, but I’m not going to tell you where they came … Continue reading → Read the full article.
  • via WildlifeSNPits from WildlifeSNPits
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    1 week 1 day ago

    An Endangered Generalist? 
    Soon after germination orchids must be colonized by fungi whose hyphae both enter orchid cells and create an extensive mycorrhizal network in the soil, thereby transferring nutrients to the plant.  Orchids may be mycorrhizal generalists able to associate with many different fungal species, or specialists only able to associate with one or a few fungi.  Thus, the distribution of fungi can limit or promote the distribution of the plant.  In this paper (sub), researchers measured which fungi associated with an endangered orchid Liparis loeselii, and measured fungal diversity at sites where the orchid did and did not grow.  They found that this orchid associated with many species of fungi from multiple different families.  While fungi diversity and abundance was different in soil...

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  • via Chris Grieves from methods.blog (Methods in Ecology and Evolution)
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 week 1 day ago
    Post provided by Lauric Thiault BACIPS (Before-After Control-Impact Paired Series) is probably the best-known and most powerful approach to detect and quantify human interventions on ecosystems. In BACIPS designs, Impact and Control sites are sampled simultaneously (or nearly so) multiple … Continue reading → Read the full article.
  • via noreply@blogger.com (Caroline Tucker) from The EEB & Flow
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 week 1 day ago
    Williams, L. J., et al. 2017. Spatial complementarity in tree crowns explains overyielding in species mixtures. - Nature Ecology & Evolution 1: 0063.

    It seems at times that the focus on whether biodiversity has a positive relationship with ecosystem functioning has been a bit limiting. Questions about the BEF relationships are important, of course, since they support arguments for protecting biodiversity and suggests a cost of failing to do so. But as a hypothesis ('higher diversity is associated with higher functioning'), they can be rather one-dimensional. It's easy to think of situations in which other types of BEF relationships (neutral, negative) exist. So is it enough to ask if positive BEF relationships exist?

    It’s nice then that there is increasingly a focus on identifying mechanisms behind BEF relationships, using both theory and empirical research. A new paper along... Read the full article.

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