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EcoBloggers


EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via Manu Saunders from Ecology is Not a Dirty Word
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago
    Pollination is a complex process. It’s not as easy as an insect simply visiting a flower. This is important to remember when talking about which species are the ‘best’ or ‘most important’ pollinators. Simply observing an animal visiting a flower… Read the full article.
  • via Journal of Applied Ecology from The Applied Ecologist's blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago
    Restoration has never been more important, with almost a third of the world’s land surface degraded. But what exactly is restoration? And how do we know if it works? Madelon Lohbeck continues our Special Feature series on Functional traits in agroecology. Read the full article, Trait-based approaches for guiding the restoration of degraded agricultural landscapes in […] Read the full article.
  • via Chris Grieves from methods.blog (Methods in Ecology and Evolution)
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago
    What is satellite data fusion, and how can it benefit ecologists and conservation scientists? In a new Methods in Ecology and Evolution video, Henrike Schulte-to-Bühne answers this question using whiteboards and questionable drawing skills. The availability and accessibility of multispectral and radar … Continue reading → Read the full article.
  • via dinoverm from Parasite Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago
    If you set a New Year’s resolution to read #260papers this year, you might want to check out some of these recent gems. (I’m not providing all of the citation info, in an attempt to prevent accidental inflation of Google … Continue reading → Read the full article.
  • via Sabrina Weiss from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago

     

    The assumption was logical, but unproven, says study author Ben Zuckerberg, an associate professor of wildlife ecology at UW-Madison. By combining more than 40 years of data from Voyageurs National Park, along the Canadian border, he, post-doctoral researcher Jennyffer Cruz and colleagues found that the breeding population of bald eagles at Voyageurs rose from fewer than 10 pairs in the late 1970s to 48 pairs by 2016.

    The study’s other authors were Steve Windels and Leland Grim from the National Park Service, Wayne Thogmartin from the U.S. Geological Survey, and Shawn Crimmins from UW-Stevens Point.
    Those numbers, however welcome, did not prove whether nest protection played any role in the increase.

    Starting in 1991, park staff began to sequester an average of nine eagle nests per year, using warning signs to deter boaters and campers. When looking at nests rather than the overall population, protection (“management”) significantly improved...

    Read the full article.
  • via Sabrina Weiss from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago

     

    Ecosystem services are environmental resources and goods which benefit the general public, e.g. farmland and mine zones provide food and minerals, respectively. The intensive use of the land to produce food and minerals negatively affects the provision of other types of services such as the elimination of pollutants, floods and drought mitigation, and reducing soil loss.

    Cultural services (recreational, aesthetic and spiritual benefits), and basic processes (soil formation, biological productivity and habitat conservation) which support these services are also important factors provided by ecosystems. As an example, the margins of a river with clean water and a well-established riparian forest give us much more benefits than those of a river with turbid water and no riparian forest. A landscape made of a mosaic of mountains and leafy valleys with integrated farmlands is much more appreciated than a site with contaminated air produce by smoking factories and...

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  • via ebach from Beneath Our Feet: the GSBI Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago
    By Panos Panagos and Cristiano Ballabio European Commission’s Joint Research Centre, Directorate D – Sustainable Resources, Land Resources Unit, Ispra, Italy




    Amount of soil lost by water erosion in 2012 at 250 × 250 m resolution for 202 countries (approx. 125 million km2).
    Image from Borrelli et al. 2017


    Soil is home of thousands of organisms, targeted by hundreds of soil biology and ecology studies. Soil is not an infinite resource, therefore, as soil biologists/ecologists, the raw material behind all of your findings is eroding away. The link between soil erosion and biology/ecology is stronger than what you may expect. As soil erosion modelers, our work improves estimates of soil loss in order to clearly assess its effects on soil life and, eventually, to develop actions to control it.

    The question is simple: how much soil is lost every year on Earth due to...

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  • via Charles Krebs from Ecological Rants
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago
    If ecology can team up with evolution to become a predictive science, we can all profit greatly since it will make us more like physics and the hard sciences. It is highly desirable to have a grand vision of accomplishing this, but there could be a few roadblocks on the way. A recent paper by […] Read the full article.
  • via Meghan Duffy from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago

    Last week, I gave one teaching tip I learned from Trisha Wittkopp: start lectures with a short video. Today, I’m giving another one I learned from Trisha: use a discussion thread to decide what to cover in a review session.

    When I first taught Intro Bio at Michigan, one of the things that made me nervous was the in class review sessions that occurred on the day of the exam. (Our exams are in the evening, and we don’t cover new material in the regular class session on the day of an exam.) I had no idea of how to structure the review sessions, so I asked the person I taught with that semester. He said he just showed up and answered questions. So, I did the same. Sometimes this led to covering useful material, but sometimes it meant that the questions were about some obscure point from the reading* or about something that few in...

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  • via Kirsty Lucas from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago

    In a recent study, examining a non-invasive DNA (hair collection) dataset of grizzly bear activity in British Columbia, Lamb and his colleagues conclusively determine what scientists have long suspected: higher road density leads to lower grizzly bear density, a critical problem for a species still rebounding from a long period of human persecution.

    “The problem with grizzly bears and roads is a North American-wide issue. This is the first study that strongly links roads to decreased grizzly bear density,” said Lamb, currently completing his PhD with University of Alberta conservation biologist Stan Boutin. “Not only do bears die near roads, bears also avoid these areas, making many habitats with roads through them less effective. By closing roads, we can reduce the negative impact of roads in a lot of ways. We can’t turn roads back into forest tomorrow, so the best thing we can do right now is to close them. The effects are immediate.”

    “The problem with grizzly bears...

    Read the full article.

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