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EcoBloggers


EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via PierreMariotte from Journal of Ecology blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 weeks 3 days ago
    Our new video podcast brings us below the ocean surface and explores the role of interacting local stressors on algal turf communities, an important driver of coral reef development and survival. This study conducted by Caitlin Fong at the University of California Santa Barbara (USA) and titled ‘Simultaneous synergistic, antagonistic and additive interactions between multiple local… Read the full article.
  • via Terry McGlynn from Small Pond Science
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 weeks 3 days ago
    Which LMS does your university you use, and do you like it? How can they be improved?
  • via CJAB from Conservation Bytes
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 weeks 4 days ago
    I love it when a good collaboration bears fruit, and our latest paper is a good demonstration of that principle. It all started a few years ago with an ARC Linkage Project grant we received to examine how the whaler shark fishing industry in Australia might manage its stocks better. As I’m sure many are […] ... Read the full article.
  • via Alex Bond from The Lab and Field
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 weeks 5 days ago

    Last week I had a fantastic chat with the Queer Science discussion group based at Memorial University of Newfoundland, which is also where I happened to do my PhD. One of the perennial questions when I talk about being an out scientist is how the LGBTQ+ side influences the science side, and vice versa. As someone not particularly versed in sociology, queer theory, or feminist studies, I lack the terminology and background to put my experiences in a broader context, so I said that I didn’t think it did (because that’s genuinely what I thought).

    But I think I was wrong.

    As one of the group members pointed out, they felt that some of my writing certainly came from a queer science view of the world, and after a bit of discussion, I think I agree. And seeing as this is a blog for some rambling thoughts, I present some rambling thoughts.

    I’ve long been interested in the how of science, whether it’s pointing out that gender and sex are...

    Read the full article.
  • via Terry McGlynn from Small Pond Science
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 weeks 6 days ago
    This case study of search committees demonstrates how downright sexist conduct is pervasive in academic job searches. When it comes to time management in academia, here is some highly condensed wisdom. It’s well established that student evaluations of teaching performance are gender biased. Based on that fact, then, here’s an intriguing question: Are they illegal? She… Read the full article.
  • via Chris Grieves from methods.blog (Methods in Ecology and Evolution)
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 weeks 6 days ago
    Post provided by Blal Adem Esmail & Davide Geneletti Comparing Apples and Oranges In real-life situations, it is far more common for decisions to be based on a comparison between things that can’t be judged on the same standards. Whether … Continue reading → Read the full article.
  • via PierreMariotte from Journal of Ecology blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    4 weeks 16 hours ago
    Richard P. Shefferson is an Associate Professor at the Organization for Programs on Environmental Sciences; a relatively new unit within the University of Tokyo aimed at research on global environmental problems and the fundamental sciences related to them. He is an evolutionary ecologist studying life history evolution in long-lived plants and fungi, and the evolution… Read the full article.
  • via CJAB from Conservation Bytes
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    4 weeks 1 day ago
    What is an effective scientist? The more I have tried to answer this question, the more it has eluded me. Before I even venture an attempt, it is necessary to distinguish the more esoteric term ‘effective’ from the more pedestrian term ‘success’. Even ‘success’ can be defined and quantified in many different ways. Is the most successful […] ... Read the full article.
  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    4 weeks 1 day ago

    Note from Jeremy: this is the second guest post in John DeLong‘s planned three part series on independent projects in large enrollment labs. Here’s part 1 if you missed it.

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    We are about halfway through our experiment basing the labs of a large enrollment ecology and evolution course on independent projects and student-driven exercises. Our goal is to offer the students an authentic scientific experience that allows them to develop their own initiative, follow their own nose, and to develop skills whose utility they can appreciate. This post is the second of three installments on this endeavor.

    The overarching lab philosophy is to put students in charge and to facilitate learning scientific skills in the context of their own work. This means that we try to offer up new ‘...

    Read the full article.
  • via Meghan Duffy from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 17 hours ago

    Last week, Terry McGlynn wrote a post with a list of things he wishes other people would write posts about. I read this minutes before heading to the airport, and this was like catnip given my #airportblogging habit. So, I sat in the airport thinking about this topic Terry suggested:

    How PhD students and postdocs are getting professional development to do things other than become a tenure-track faculty member

    This is something I’ve been discussing a lot on seminar trips, with prospective grad students, and with colleagues, but I hadn’t thought about writing a post on it before. So, with thanks to Terry for the prompt, here’s the story of how one of my students has explored career interests outside academia.

    As I’ve written about before...

    Read the full article.

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