You are here

EcoBloggers


EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago
  • via WildlifeSNPits from WildlifeSNPits
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago

    Patriotism is defined as “having or showing great love and support for your country.” This Fourth of July, American bloggers Stephanie Schuttler and Emily Puckett show how supporting science reflects great love and support for the United States of America and is a democratic process in and of itself.

    1. Science inspires. Scientific and technological innovations made it possible to put a man on the moon and explore the depths of the ocean.  These events are an inspiration to the public and motivate scientists to keep pushing the limits of what is possible. These achievements, like Olympic medals, are worn with great pride by citizens and scientists alike. Mars, here we come.
    2. Science stimulates the ECONOMY. Stronger research programs mean more STEM jobs, which ultimately makes the United States competitive in global markets. Research-based businesses (think biotech, aerotech, or medical research) and universities create...
    Read the full article.
  • via freshwaterblog from The BioFresh blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago
    7599505330_33aae97c4a_k

    A Swedish boreal stream. Image: mrdonb | Flickr Creative Commons

    Freshwater ecosystems across the world are affected by multiple pressures acting in tandem, which can cause complex and unpredictable results for their health and diversity. As a result, the topic is a key focus for many aquatic scientists globally.

    Human land use is an important driver of multiple pressures. Two common land-use pressures stem from agricultural activities and hydromorphological alterations. Agricultural activities can cause increased nutrient concentrations as a result of fertiliser run-off, cause sediment build-ups as a result of soil erosion, and alter ecosystem hydrology and connectivity through water abstraction.

    ...

    Read the full article.
  • via Florian Hartig from Theoretical Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 2 weeks ago
    As I said before, I’m firmly siding with Andrew Gelman (see e.g. here) in that model checking is dangerously neglected in Bayesian practice. The philosophical criticism against “rejecting” models (double-using data etc. etc.) is all well, but when using Bayesian methods in practice, I see few sensible alternatives to residual checks (both guessing a model and… Read the full article.
  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 2 weeks ago

    1089558


    Filed under:... Read the full article.
  • via dinoverm from Parasite Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 2 weeks ago
    EEID 2017 in Santa Barbara was a hit! The poster session and all of the social events took place outside in beautiful weather, to the immense enjoyment of (almost) everyone. There were 57 talks and ~135 posters, which added up … Continue reading → Read the full article.
  • via Journal of Applied Ecology from The Applied Ecologist's blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 2 weeks ago
    In this post, Daniel Bergin discusses issue 54.3’s Practitioner’s Perspective, Holistic management of live animals confiscated from illegal wildlife trade by Dr. Thomas Gray and colleagues. Armed detectives burst through the door. Traffickers are arrested, media coverage generated, and live animals are rescued from the illegal wildlife trade. But what happens next? What happens next is […] Read the full article.
  • via CJAB from Conservation Bytes
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 2 weeks ago
    Just like there are many styles to writing scientific manuscripts, there are also many ways to respond to a set of criticisms and suggestions from reviewers. Likewise, many people and organisations have compiled lists of what to do, and what not to do, in a response to reviews of your manuscript (just type ‘response to […] ... Read the full article.
  • via EEPuckett from WildlifeSNPits
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 2 weeks ago

    In 2009 the United Nations reported that half of the world’s human population lived in cities and was expected to grow to 66% by 2050.  The movement of people from dispersed living to concentration in urban environments is a large change both for human civilization and for the environment.  Urbanization is the process of changing from natural habitats to dense grey space made up primarily of buildings, roads, and accessory infrastructure (e.g. street lights, underground sewage pipes, power lines, etc) accompanied by dense human populations.  While many cities are well established, humans continue to build new cities or expand cities outward in a network of suburban environments.  And urbanization is not simply about a transition from green to grey space, other abiotic changes such as changes in light regimens due to artificial lighting, increased pollution, and increased...

    Read the full article.
  • via Benjamin Blonder from Natural Curiosities
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 2 weeks ago

Pages

Powered by Drupal | Theme modified by Naupaka Zimmerman from Danland by Danetsoft | | INNGE is supported through a collaboration with INTECOL