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EcoBloggers


EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via Journal of Applied Ecology from The Applied Ecologist's blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 week 1 day ago
    The Editor’s Choice for Issue 54:2 is written by Kulbhushansingh Suryawanshi, who is taking part in our Associate Editor mentoring opportunity. The article chosen by the Editors as this issue’s Editor’s choice article is ‘Limitations and trade-offs in the use of species distribution maps for protected area planning‘ by Moreno Di Marco and colleagues. Protected […] Read the full article.
  • via admin from BRIT Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 week 1 day ago
    This is the first in a new “Where Are They Now?”series featuring guest posts from former interns, volunteers, staff, and friends of BRIT. This month’s post is from former BRIT intern and herbarium staff, Miranda Madrid. Hello! I wanted to … Continue reading → Read the full article.
  • via Charles Krebs from Ecological Rants
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 week 2 days ago
    There are two global views about wildlife management that are echoed in conservation biology. The first view is that we manage wildlife for the sake of wildlife so that future generations have the ability to see what we see when we go out into the woods and fields. The second view is that we manage […] Read the full article.
  • via colindonihue from Colin Donihue
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 week 2 days ago

    Initially I thought getting to Redonda was going to be a challenge, but the helicopter made that aspect of the trip a delightful adventure. Living on Redonda for a week, though—that was tough. In retrospect, I’d say the challenge was simultaneously harder than anticipated but more comfortable than I’d feared.

    Here’s a panorama of our camp:

    ...

    Read the full article.
  • via ebach from Beneath Our Feet: the GSBI Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 week 2 days ago


    A young pistachio orchard (foreground) in a larger
    maize cropping system on the banks of the
    Orange River, Prieska, South Africa.

    By Prof. Schalk vdM. Louw, Centre for Plant Health Management, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa.

    This article appeared previously in the Ons Eie magazine, April 2007

     

    Agricultural landscapes are by implication complex adaptive systems, tailored by anthropogenic interference. The relationship between structure and function, e.g. trophic structures, diversity - productivity connections and nutrient fluctuation patterns of such landscapes is fundamental in their organization, whether self-driven or regulated. In cropping system landscapes, we are obligated to understand the processes that influence the abundance, richness and diversity of biota that...

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  • via EEPuckett from WildlifeSNPits
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 week 2 days ago

    I’ve got this feeling that CRISPR is the next PCR.  Have you ever met someone who was an early adopter of PCR?  No, I mean an early adopter of PCR where the technique required three water baths, a swivel chair, a stop watch, and AN ACTUAL PERSON to move the reaction tubes between water baths every 30 seconds.  Now it’s so common PCR is undergrad grunt work.  That’s how I feel about CRISPR, like it will be undergrad grunt work in 20 years, so I better stop ignoring and start incorporating it into my science.

    What is CRISPR?
    Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat

    CRISPR is a natural immune response in bacteria to defend against viruses.  It cuts both strands of the DNA of an invading pathogen, thereby disrupting replication and gene expression.  Molecular biologists took this idea and turned it into a tool for...

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  • via GrrlScientist, Contributor from GrrlScientist
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 week 3 days ago
    Six books are shortlisted for the Wellcome Book Prize, which celebrates the finest recently-published English-language fiction and nonfiction books that explore the many ways that health and medicine affect our lives
  • via colindonihue from Colin Donihue
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 week 3 days ago

    I’ve decided to break up the Redonda posts thematically. There’s a bit of a beginning, middle, and end to the trip, but the experience day-by-day makes less sense than talking about big things that we were working on in Redonda that often spanned several days. First up, getting to Redonda!

    Helicopter

    As I’d mentioned previously, the...

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  • via James Ross from Journal of Ecology blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 week 3 days ago
    To mark the Savanna Science Network Meeting 2017 in South Africa, Deron Burkpile has written a blog about his recent study based in Kruger National Park. His paper, based on African savanna herbivores and plant richness, will also have a commentary paper about it in the next issue, so keep an eye out for that! Keep up with… Read the full article.
  • via Chris Grieves from methods.blog (Methods in Ecology and Evolution)
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 week 3 days ago
    In a new Methods in Ecology and Evolution podcast, Georgina Brennan (Bangor University) interviews Simon Creer (Bangor University) about his article ‘The ecologist’s field guide to sequence-based identification of biodiversity‘. They talk about about where the idea for the paper came from, … Continue reading → Read the full article.

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