You are here

EcoBloggers


EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via James Ross from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 9 hours ago

    “Lianas are well known as rivals of trees in tropical forests because lianas compete with trees for sunlight; until this study, however, we didn’t know to what extent lianas actually reduce tropical tree reproduction,” says Stefan Schnitzer, research associate at STRI and Mellon distinguished professor of biology at Marquette University.

    Lianas climb up tree trunks into the sunlit forest canopy, where they spread their leaves and reduce the light available to the very trees that support them. Lianas have a competitive advantage compared to trees because they do not invest as much energy in making large stems to support themselves — instead they use the architecture of their host trees. Rooted in the soil, lianas also compete with their host trees for water, nutrients and other belowground resources.

    Schnitzer’s team works in Panama at...

    Read the full article.
  • via James Ross from Journal of Ecology blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 9 hours ago
    Press release from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute Woody vines, known as lianas, compete intensely with trees and their numbers are on the rise in many tropical forests around the world. A new study, published in Journal of Ecology, from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama shows that lianas prevent canopy trees from… Read the full article.
  • from Nature's Confluence
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 10 hours ago
    Mark Schwartz ​Approaching 8 billion people, it has never been more apparent that environmental management requires difficult discussions about this tension between individual freedom (e.g., to exploit) and societal interests (e.g., to protect). Population growth has meant that nearly all decisions in the environment are contested in this crowded world where people are everywhere, exploiting everything. I suppose that it is inevitable that conservation groups look around and see population growth as the root of the problem, and the key to long-term solutions.
    A more nuanced view of the fundamental drivers of environmental degradation looks at resource use, human footprints and income disparity as a core root of the problem. The earth would be able to support 8 billion people much more readily if a couple billion of us (with wealth) lived more like the rest (who lack wealth). This leads to consideration of life choices and an emphasis on the individual choice to leave... Read the full article.
  • via ebach from Beneath Our Feet: the GSBI Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 15 hours ago
    By Nico Eisenhauer, Professor for Experimental Interaction Ecology, German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research

    Many, if not most, of the ecosystems on Earth are dependent on, or substantially influenced by, interactions and processes occurring within and among the planet’s soils. The remarkable biodiversity harbored in soil provides essential ecosystem services, and the sustainable management of soils has attracted ever-increasing scientific attention. Although soil ecology emerged as an independent field of research many decades ago, and we have gained important insights into the functioning of soils, there still are fundamental aspects that need to be better understood to ensure that the ecosystem services that soils provide are not lost and that soils can be used in a sustainable way. In a recent Opinion Paper (Eisenhauer et al. 2017; https://doi.org/10.1016/j....

    Read the full article.
  • via Siri McDonnell from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 1 day ago

     

    INTECOL 2017

    The 12th International Congress of Ecology (INTECOL 2017) takes place in Beijing from 20 – 25 August this year. We have Travel Grants available for our student members to attend the meeting from anywhere in the world and present their research. Grants of up to £1000 are available and are awarded on a first come first serve basis.

    Applications will close once all grant funding has been awarded.

    If you wish to apply for a Travel Grant to attend INTECOL, please note the same conditions apply as the standard Training & Travel Grants.

    For more details

    The post Travel Grants to attend INTECOL 2017 appeared first on British Ecological Society...

    Read the full article.
  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 1 day ago

    Do you know Portland, OR? Do you like to eat food and drink drinks? We need your help! We’re looking for a volunteer to write a guest post for us on where to eat and drink in Portland for the ESA meeting.

    Here’s an example of the sort of thing we’re looking for. But feel free to give it your own personal spin.

    We’ve been doing these “where to eat and drink at the ESA meeting” posts for several years now and readers find them super-useful. So this is your chance to share what you love about Portland with lots of ecologists!

    The ideal volunteer will be able to bang something out soon, so that those attending Evolution 2017 in Portland June 23-27 can benefit as well.

    If you’re up for it, email me (jefox@ucalgary.ca) or tweet to @DynamicEcology.

    p.s. I...

    Read the full article.
  • via Siri McDonnell from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 1 day ago

    This includes all Plenary Talks, Thematic Topic Sessions and Open Oral Sessions.

    All talks have been grouped into playlists for each day of the meeting on our YouTube channel. Each video represents one session or plenary and are named accordingly.

    The links to all recordings can be found below:

    Monday 11 December

    Tuesday 12 December

    Wednesday 13 December

    All talks from our 2016 Annual Meeting were recorded, unless requested otherwise. If you have a preference for the talk not to be shown, then please contact us here.

    We have made every effort to include all talks, however gaps will appear where...

    Read the full article.
  • via Camilla Morrison-Bell from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 1 day ago

    At this tumultuous time for UK politics, the need for policymaking to be informed by the best available evidence has never been more important.

    We are therefore delighted to announce the launch of our first BES Policy Fellowship with UK Government. With applications open to all members with at least five years’ experience post-PhD, and up to £20,000 funding available, the 2017 Fellow will spend up to six months on a placement embedded within Defra’s Environment Analysis Unit, applying their scientific expertise to a practical policy challenge.

    As the UK prepares to leave the EU, critical decisions will be made about the future of our environmental policy framework, with opportunities to develop innovative new approaches. Gathering, synthesising and communicating the best scientific evidence – from how to maximise the environmental benefits of land management schemes,...

    Read the full article.
  • via Florian Hartig from Theoretical Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 2 days ago
    We are pleased to announce our 7th international summer school on Bayesian Modelling in the ecological and environmental sciences (see past courses here). This year the course will take place at the Heathland Centre on the beautiful island of Lygra in western Norway. Motivation Bayesian inference is an increasingly used statistical framework in ecology and… Read the full article.
  • via Alex Bond from The Lab and Field
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 3 days ago

    In the last several months/years, I’ve seen an increasing number of “diversity initiatives”, and attention paid to issues of diversity in STEM fields. Which is, on the whole, good. But as a member of a minority community, these can often come across as botched jobs. Scientists are good at science, but not necessarily (or one might say not at all good) at sociology and psychology.

    And it’s become tiring.

    Here, dear reader, is a handy, easily digested checklist (because who in science doesn’t like checklists) for how not to completely miss the mark with whatever “diversity initiative” you might want to do. As you’ll see, these are all inter-related, and some/many of them aren’t easy or to be taken lightly.

    1. What? What do you want to get out of this exercise, tangibly? Cut the vagueness. Make your objectives SMART. If you can...
    Read the full article.

Pages

Powered by Drupal | Theme modified by Naupaka Zimmerman from Danland by Danetsoft | | INNGE is supported through a collaboration with INTECOL