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EcoBloggers


EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via Journal of Applied Ecology from The Applied Ecologist's blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago
    In this infographic, Clayton Lamb demonstrates how reducing roads and restricting vehicle access can support grizzly bear density. Read the full article, Effects of habitat quality and access management on the density of a recovering grizzly bear population in Journal of Applied Ecology. Filed under: Infographic, Research Summary
  • via Sabrina Weiss from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago

     

    Benjamin Zuckerberg, a professor in the Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology at UW–Madison, led the research. His team report their findings today in the Journal of Applied Ecology. Their work could help improve bird monitoring programs by helping predict when botulism-related deaths are likely to spike.

    Birds can contract botulism in much the same way people can — by eating food infected with the toxin-producing bacteria. The toxin leads to paralysis and death, often by drowning in waterfowl. To keep track of these deaths, the USGS National Wildlife Health Center created a citizen-science program called AMBLE (Avian Monitoring for Botulism Lakeshore Events) in 2010.

    Volunteers for the aptly-named AMBLE regularly walked beaches in Door County, Wisconsin, Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore in Michigan and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan recording the number of sick and dead birds of different species. Researchers at the Wildlife Health...

    Read the full article.
  • via Camilla Morrison-Bell from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago

    Michael Gove delivered a plenary on the 4th January 2018 to the Oxford Farming Conference (video and transcript), also taking part in a question and answer session.  On the 5th January, he took part in a question and answer session at the Oxford Real Farming Conference, a more recently established event with a sustainability-focussed remit.

    At both events, he emphasised that the government would like to move to an agricultural payment system of public payments for public goods. Mr Gove expressed that subsidies would be reformed to incentivise sustainable soil health, the improvement of water quality and the protection of wildlife, for instance, by encouraging wild flower meadows and woodland creation. The removal of area...

    Read the full article.
  • via Terry McGlynn from Small Pond Science
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago

    If you keep your door open, do your students know that this means that you’re available for a conversation?

    Last summer, I spent several days in the field with a bunch of students. I wanted to catch up with them, talk about the rest of their summer and their plans for the fall semester, and whatnot. Classes had been running for well over a month, and I hadn’t really seen these students around. I bumped into one student in the hallway, and asked, “Hey, how are you? What’s up? How are the others?” And he told me, “I came by your office to talk, but you looked really busy on your computer.”

    Then, he told me how the others had told him that they had passed by, but I was really busy typing and they didn’t want disturb me.

    I have my desk situated so that my desk is at about a 100 degree angle from me when I’m looking at my computer — there’s enough hallway traffic that facing the door directly would be...

    Read the full article.
  • via Adrian Paterson from EcoLincNZ
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago
    http://www.lincolnecology.org.nz/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/ecolincnz-podcast4.m4a

    Mike Bowie has been passionate about preserving and restoring biodiversity for his whole career. He has worked with a number of community groups to achieve this goal. He is also very active in outreach and can often be found with school groups introducing the next generations to the diversity of life around them. Adrian talks to Mike about what got him into this research area, how he got involved with various community groups, how you can monitor for invertebrates in an area to see what diversity you have, how to restore diversity to the Canterbury Plains, Quail Island and Te Ara Kakariki, and how adding native plantings to irrigated dairy farms is a win-win for the environment and the farms.

    ...

    Read the full article.
  • via CJAB from Conservation Bytes
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 2 weeks ago
    An edited version of a snippet from my upcoming book, The Effective Scientist (due out in March 2018). — I tend to assume tacitly that my collaborators are indeed entirely fine with the idea of having their hard-won data spread across the internet, and that anyone can access and use them. In reality, many are probably […] ... Read the full article.
  • via EcoEvo@TCD from EcoEvo@TCD
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 2 weeks ago

    Featured Undergraduate post by Ciara O’Flynn.

    At first glance, plants seem impressively independent. Unlike us, they can make their own food, through a process called photosynthesis which uses energy from sunlight. This is a pretty neat ability but, plants aren’t entirely self-sufficient. In order to grow and develop fully, they must get a sufficient supply of minerals from the soil – including a particularly important mineral: Nitrogen.

    You might be deceived into thinking this is an easy task. Nitrogen does make up 78% of our atmosphere after all. However, plants can only assimilate nitrogen in the form of nitrate or ammonium, which means the nitrogen in our atmosphere first needs to be converted into one of these forms. This can be...

    Read the full article.
  • via Chris Grieves from methods.blog (Methods in Ecology and Evolution)
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 2 weeks ago
    Happy New Year! We hope that you all had a wonderful Winter Break and that you’re ready to start 2018. We’re beginning the year with a look back at some of our highlights of 2017. Here’s how last year looked … Continue reading → Read the full article.
  • via WildlifeSNPits from WildlifeSNPits
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 2 weeks ago

    Happy New Year from the WildlifeSNPits team!

    All the Pretty Birds
    This open paper investigated the phylogenetic and biogeographic relationships between Kingfishers, an order of birds with 114 species.  Kingfishers are known for their beautiful bright colors, but how the different species are related to each other was partially unknown.  The authors inferred that kingfishers originated between modern day India-Southeast Asia-Indonesian Archipelago and before colonizing Africa, the Philippines, and Australia/Papua New Guinea on separate occasions.  From these colonizations, kingfishers went even further and are now found on every continent except Antarctica.  Of the 114 species, IUCN lists 6 as endangered, 10 as vulnerable to extinction, 25 as near threatened, and 73 as least concern.  The phylogeny and biogeographic information within this paper will inform...

    Read the full article.
  • via freshwaterblog from The BioFresh blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 2 weeks ago
    PR_MOSA_06_EN

    Museum of Natural Sciences, Brussels. Image: IRSNB – Thierry Hubin

    Over the last four years, the MARS project has investigated the impacts and interactions of multiple stressors in European aquatic ecosystems. Funded under the EU FP7 programme, research within MARS has addressed uncertainties over how to detect, conceptualise and manage multiple stressors in surface waters. MARS was designed to support the implementation and review of the EU Water Framework.

    This month MARS will host a conference ‘Managing multiple stress for multiple...

    Read the full article.

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