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EcoBloggers


EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • from Natural Musings
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 4 days ago
    For awhile, I've been working on plant defense and other aspects of the ecology of the sand-verbenas (here and here). Despite being much-beloved coastal and desert wildflowers, Abronia species have a (slightly deserved) reputation for being hard to germinate, hard to keep alive, and just generally not that great plants. Thus, they are uncommon in gardens of even the most diehard native plant folks.

    ...
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  • via noreply@blogger.com (David Steen) from Living Alongside Wildlife
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 4 days ago
    Greetings- Can you please help me identify this snake from Austin, TX?  He was about 3.5’ long (missing end of tail) with a thick body and triangular head.  He has been placed back into nature. Thank you for all you do, Michelle N. Texas Hi! I came across your website when I was looking to identify as snake I came across earlier today so thought I'd
  • via Camilla Morrison-Bell from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 4 days ago

    While the Conservatives remain the largest party in the House of Commons, they have fallen short of an overall majority. The Prime Minister, Theresa May, has visited the Queen to request permission to form a government, and has indicated her intention to form a minority administration with the support of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), returned as Northern Ireland’s largest party with ten seats. Mrs May affirmed her intention to provide “certainty”, and to deliver the UK’s departure from the European Union to the existing timetable.

    On a night where many expectations were confounded, the Conservatives lost 12 seats to fall 8 short of an overall majority on 318, despite increasing their share of the vote. Labour outperformed many of the polls by gaining 29 seats, ending on 40% of the vote compared to the Conservatives’ 42.4%. In Scotland, the Scottish National Party’s dominance was reduced as they lost 21 seats, while the Liberal Democrats, Plaid Cymru, the DUP and Sinn...

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  • via freshwaterblog from The BioFresh blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 4 days ago
    Projekt SOLUTIONS

    LVSPE during the Joint Danube Survey 2013. Image: André Künzelmann (UFZ, Leipzig, Germany)

    A guest post by Tobias Schulze, Martin Krauss, Jörg Ahlheim, David López Herráez, and Werner Brack of the EU SOLUTIONS project.

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    It is becoming more and more obvious: the analysis of individual chemicals is not sufficient to monitor water quality in rivers and lakes which increasingly contain mixtures of...

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  • via Benjamin Blonder from Natural Curiosities
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 4 days ago
  • via Chris Grieves from methods.blog (Methods in Ecology and Evolution)
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 5 days ago
    Issue 8.6 is now online! The April issue of Methods, which includes our latest Special Feature – ‘How to Measure Natural Selection‘ – is now online! Understanding how and why some individuals survive and reproduce better than others, the traits that allow them … Continue reading → Read the full article.
  • via CJAB from Conservation Bytes
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 5 days ago
    New roads can be treacherous — even fatal — for wildlife, native forests, and the global environment. If you don’t believe this, just watch this two-minute video, “Why Roads Are So Dangerous” New roads can also be surprisingly risky for human economies and societies, as shown in this brief video, “Why Roads are Like Pandora’s Box”. […] ... Read the full article.
  • via Journal of Applied Ecology from The Applied Ecologist's blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 5 days ago
    With a focus on community engagement, Matthias Fiechter, Charudutt Mishra, Steve Redpath, Brad Rutherford and Juliette Young, discuss the PARTNERS principle and importance of working with people towards conservation efforts. This post supports their recent Journal of Applied Ecology Practitioner’s Perspective, Building partnerships with communities for biodiversity conservation: lessons from Asian mountains. We’re currently witnesses to – […] Read the full article.
  • via ebach from Beneath Our Feet: the GSBI Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 5 days ago
    By Olaf Schmidt (University College Dublin, Ireland) and Maria J. I. Briones (University of Vigo, Spain)

     

    Let us beat our swords into ploughshares” is an evocative slogan used by peace builders around the world. However, when it comes to earthworms, ploughs are swords that can kill you and destroy your homes.

    We have known for a long time that tillage operations impact large soil macrofauna such as earthworms, directly by mechanical injury and indirectly by destroying their channels and burying surface plant residues. For example, a study from Ireland showed that very intensive soil cultivation for potato production (including grubbing, destoning and ridging) can virtually eliminate earthworm populations. Many such individual studies exist around the world. For the first time, scientists have...

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  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 6 days ago

    It’s been almost three years since we last took the pulse of our readers and invited feedback on how we can improve Dynamic Ecology. During that time, our readership has grown and changed. These surveys are our only source of non-anecdotal information about what y’all think of us, and they help Brian, Meghan, and I justify our blogging to our employers and funding agencies.

    Please take a few minutes to complete the anonymous survey below. Please complete it even if you’re not a regular reader; it’s not very helpful if only our biggest fans complete it. We’ll summarize the results in a future post. Thanks in advance for your help!

    UPDATE: Responses have slowed to a trickle of just a couple per day, so the survey has been closed.


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