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EcoBloggers


EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via Journal of Applied Ecology from The Applied Ecologist's blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 day ago
    In this post Rebecca Barak discusses her recent article ‘Restored tallgrass prairies have reduced phylogenetic diversity compared with remnants‘ Tallgrass prairie is one of the most endangered habitats on earth. In my home state of Illinois, USA, back in 1820, almost 60% of the state was covered by prairie – 8,760,750 hectares or 33,825 square miles! […] Read the full article.
  • from Joseph Stachelek
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 day ago
    ```{r setup, include=FALSE} knitr::opts_chunk$set(echo = TRUE) ``` The `dataone` package enables users to construct programmatic queries to DataONE data repositories. This should go a long way towards increasing reproducibility. Here I show an analysis where I attempt to locate and analyze Oneida Lake benthic invertebrate data all without leaving my RStudio session. ## Setup I know that my target data is on KNB so I start by setting up `dataone` for a node specific search: ```{r } library(dataone) cn <- CNode("PROD") mn <- getMNode(cn, "urn:node:KNB") cli <- D1Client("PROD", "urn:node:KNB") ``` ## Get data Initially, I have no idea how to locate the package I am interested other than knowing that the title should include the _benthic_ and _Oneida_ keywords. I use the Solr query method to query the database on the _Oneida_ keyword while running a filter on the results corresponding to the _benthic_ keyword. We limit the result fields to _id_, _title_, and... Read the full article.
  • via Terry McGlynn from Small Pond Science
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 2 days ago

    The times have changed, and our curriculum is not keeping up.

    In the various majors offered by our Department of Biology, I’m convinced we’re not providing our students the most useful set of quantitative skills. After browsing the catalogs of a variety of other universities, I think we’re not alone.

    Our curriculum has shortcomings when it comes to statistics, experimental design, and data visualization, interpretation, and management. I would guess that most of our faculty teaching upper division undergraduate courses would say that that things would be a lot better if our lower division students were provided with more opportunities to increase statistical, experimental, and data literacy.

    We can’t add more units to our major, because reasons*. To add coursework related to data literacy, we’d have to cut something. I’d be all up for cutting calculus.

    Our majors need to complete a semester of calculus, and some take...

    Read the full article.
  • via Meghan Duffy from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 2 days ago

    A couple of months ago, a reader of the blog sent me an email containing a figure she’d made from this year’s ecology job wiki, using data from the “anonymous qualifications” sheet. That figure suggested that women might be waiting longer than men to start applying for tenure track jobs — or, more specifically, that men might be more likely that women to apply for faculty positions while still in grad school or within the first year after getting their PhD. After recreating the figure myself and also looking at the 2015-2016 job wiki and finding a similar pattern, I decided to do...

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  • via James Ross from Journal of Ecology blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 2 days ago
    This week is Invasive Species Week! Organised by the NNSS and Defra, Invasive Species Week brings together a range of organisations to raise awareness of invasive non-native species and inspire people to get involved to stop the spread. Each day there is a different theme,  so keep up by following @CheckCleanDryGB or searching #InvasivesWeek. To celebrate, we have decided… Read the full article.
  • via Camilla Morrison-Bell from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 2 days ago

    This is the third year Invasive Species Week has been running and it aims to bring organisations across Britain together, to raise awareness of invasive non-native species (INNS) and to inspire people to take action to prevent their spread. Within the Wildlife and Countryside Link Invasive Non-Native Species Working Group (which I Chair) we are raising awareness of the impacts INNS have on our wildlife. This blog post will also feature as part of a series of blogs on the Wildlife and Countryside Link website during Invasive Species Week. I want to use this opportunity to concentrate on advancing the evidence of INNS.

    Finding existing evidence:

    Ecological evidence plays a big part in understanding what makes a non-native species invasive. It is vital to understand the ecology of invasive species and their potential impacts, as...

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  • via CJAB from Conservation Bytes
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 days ago
    Coral reef fishes are wonderfully diverse in size, form, and function, as well as their need for different habitats throughout the life cycle. Some species spend all of their life in the same kind of coral habitat, while others need different places to breed and feed. Fishes requiring different habitats as they progress through life […] ... Read the full article.
  • via Stephanie Schuttler from WildlifeSNPits
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 days ago

    I get a daily alert from Vogue magazine (I know, shocking!). Today, I clicked on a link to check out model Emily Ratajkowski’s vacation photos from Mexico and was shocked to see her Instagram holding a baby sea turtle. This is bad for so many reasons. I am writing this blog to draw attention to this issue and ultimately get her to remove her Instagram post, and instead post a new photo explaining why this type of post is so bad for sea turtles and all endangered species.

    ...

    Read the full article.
  • via jeffollerton from Jeff Ollerton
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 days ago
  • via GrrlScientist, Contributor from GrrlScientist
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 5 days ago
    The kea parrot (Nestor notabilis), produces a laughter-like “play call” when they are playing. Researchers used recorded play calls from captive kea to test how they affected wild kea and found both juveniles and adults respond to the recorded play call -- by playing!

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