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EcoBloggers


EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via Terry McGlynn from Small Pond Science
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago
    Why double-blind review is way better than zero-blind review.
  • via Alex Bond from The Lab and Field
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago

    I think it’s safe to say a good number of us struggle with the large amount considerable volume overwhelming flood of email.

    emails

    And many of us have implemented solutions, and there’s been lots of discussion about how to stem the tide that washes over us almost daily (see this post...

    Read the full article.
  • via Terry McGlynn from Small Pond Science
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago
    Why I stopped writing on my student’s papers. Four very practical solutions to make conferences less difficult for scientists who are bringing babies and small children, brought to you by Rebecca Calisi and a Working Group of Mothers in Science. Are you part of an organizing committee? Please heed. The case for inclusive teaching The… Read the full article.
  • via Terry McGlynn from Small Pond Science
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago
    I’d like to think I’m not a clueless ignoramus when it comes to navigating university bureaucracy, but sometimes evidence gets in the way. Let me attempt to recreate some dialogue from our Academic Senate meeting from last month, as an illustration. Wise and Experienced Administrator 1: We’ve had many successes when it comes to the… Read the full article.
  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago

    One thing that faculty search committees for positions with significant research expectations like to see is applicants who publish in leading selective journals. I have an old post that talks a bit about why that is (tl;dr: there are good reasons for it). For better or worse (and your mileage may vary on which it is…), Nature, Science, and PNAS are at the top of many people’s mental list of the leading journals in ecology (and most other scientific fields).

    This has various consequences. One of which is that, anecdotally, papers in Nature/Science/PNAS seem to take on an outsized importance in the minds of at least some faculty job seekers. I’ve heard people say that you have to have a Nature/Science/PNAS paper to be competitive for a faculty position, at least at a research university. And...

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  • via PierreMariotte from Journal of Ecology blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago
    Maxime Cailleret and colleagues from the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (Switzerland) recently published a review titled ‘Ozone effects on European forest growth – Towards an integrative approach‘. Maxime tell us more about the paper below. Tropospheric ozone is a key greenhouse gas responsible for 5-16% of the global temperature change since preindustrial… Read the full article.
  • via CJAB from Conservation Bytes
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago
    The next set of six biodiversity cartoons for 2018. See full stock of previous ‘Cartoon guide to biodiversity loss’ compendia here. — ... Read the full article.
  • via Terry McGlynn from Small Pond Science
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 2 weeks ago
    This new blog on the block has a bunch of content - and every ecologist can post there.
  • via Terry McGlynn from Small Pond Science
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 2 weeks ago
    Last week, I heard a brief snippet of a remark that has really transformed my thinking about how we are all hypocrites.
  • via PierreMariotte from Journal of Ecology blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 2 weeks ago
    Liesje Mommer‘s research focuses on  “belowground plant-plant interactions” within the Plant Ecology and Nature Conservation group of Wageningen University, the Netherlands. Recently, the theme of her research has expanded to include plant-fungal interactions, as root-root interactions cannot be understood without considering the myriad of microbes in the soil. To reveal these ‘hidden’ interactions and the consequences… Read the full article.

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