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EcoBloggers


EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via Manu Saunders from Ecology is Not a Dirty Word
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 6 days ago
    This post is from my PhD student Rebecca Peisley, who I co-supervised with Gary Luck. Rebecca submitted her thesis earlier this year. Find the paper here: The role of avian scavengers in the breakdown of carcasses in pastoral landscapes.  Also… Read the full article.
  • via Meghan Duffy from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 weeks 4 hours ago

    NSF’s Directorate of Biological Sciences just announced that they are getting rid of the Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grant (DDIG) program. Current DDIGs are not affected, but they will not be accepting future DDIG proposals. This is really sad to me, as this was such a great way for students to get experience with writing NSF grant proposals and it was an important source of funding for many graduate students. It also surprises me, since I’d always heard the return on investment (ROI) was amazing for this program. It’s certainly labor intensive on NSF’s part (even though the grants are small, it still required lining up panelists and holding a panel*), but I’d also heard that the bang-for-the-buck was really high for these proposals. They typically funded one small(ish) project that was pretty likely to succeed (or else it wouldn’t have been competitive), usually covering...

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  • via carstenfdormann from Theoretical Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 weeks 7 hours ago
    A guest post by Carsten F. Dormann Over the last years, I have been using null models more often than I liked. I had to, when there was no other way to figure out if an ecological pattern was unexpected, or trivial. Inspired by some recent (and also some older) posts, I thought I might throw around… Read the full article.
  • via Meghan Duffy from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 weeks 8 hours ago

    Last week, there was a Nature News piece on time-management that included interviews with several academics, including myself. The article quotes ecologist Richard Primack as saying, “I hire professional editors to help me polish my articles, grant proposals and reports.” he says. “I can do this myself, but it’s more efficient for me to pay someone to help.” This stuck out to me. I had heard of professional editing services that aim to improve the grammar of a manuscript (my impression was that these are generally aimed at non-native English speakers), but that someone in Primack’s position might use a professional editor had never occurred to me. And it made me think: should I be doing this?

    It led me to wonder (on twitter) about how common this practice is, and how easy/hard it is to find good professional...

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  • via Euan Ritchie from Euan Ritchie
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 weeks 9 hours ago
  • via Chris Grieves from methods.blog (Methods in Ecology and Evolution)
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 weeks 9 hours ago
    Post provided by Ditch Townsend and Robert Colwell Different Paths to Science DITCH: Amateur naturalists from the UK have a distinguished pedigree, from Henry Walter Bates and Marianne North, to Alfred Russel Wallace and Mary Anning. But arguably, the rise … Continue reading → Read the full article.
  • via Emilie Aimé from Journal of Ecology blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 weeks 1 day ago
    Here at the BES publishing team we’re looking forward to next month’s symposium entitled The Macroecology of Alien Species: Patterns, Drivers and Consequences of Global Biotic Exchange, where Journal of Ecology, Journal of Animal Ecology and Journal of Applied Ecology will be sponsoring a drinks reception. The symposium will be held in the lovely and… Read the full article.
  • via Siri McDonnell from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 weeks 1 day ago

    This is a great opportunity to be part of an interesting Committee, which is integral to developing the Society’s grants portfolio. The Society provides grants to promote excellent ecological research, support early career ecologists, help fund training and travel, and to communicate ecological science as widely as possible. In recent years, over £350,000 per annum has been awarded globally through the various society grants. Please see our website for more details on the individual grant types.

    Grants Committee is directly responsible for the decision making process with regards to grant applications received by the BES, alongside comments provided by our Review College. It is also responsible for setting the annual budget, reviewing the strategic aims of the committee and ensuring the needs of the ecological community...

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  • via Euan Ritchie from Euan Ritchie
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 weeks 1 day ago

    Authors: Lily M van Eden, Chris R Dickman, Euan G Ritchie, and Thomas M Newsome

    Published in: Biodiversity and Conservation

    Abstract

    Over the last century, changing public attitudes about the value of wildlife have triggered substantial changes in species management that have both benefited and hindered conservation efforts. Understanding and integrating contemporary public values is therefore critical for effective conservation outcomes.

    Using historic and contemporary examples, we highlight how public attitudes—expressed through the media and campaigns—are shaping the management of introduced and native species, as values shift towards animal welfare and mutualism. We focus on the issue of deliberate human-caused killing of wildlife, because protests against such management have disrupted traditional political and management structures that favoured eradication of wildlife across many jurisdictions and ecological...

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  • via Chris Grieves from methods.blog (Methods in Ecology and Evolution)
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 weeks 1 day ago
    Ordination and clustering methods are widely applied to ecological data that are non-negative (like species abundances or biomasses). These methods rely on a measure of multivariate proximity that quantifies differences between the sampling units (e.g. individuals, stations, time points), leading … Continue reading → Read the full article.

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