You are here

EcoBloggers


EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via Terry McGlynn from Small Pond Science
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    4 months 2 weeks ago

    I’ve read a lot of research proposals and manuscripts. Some manuscripts were rejected, and some proposals didn’t fare so favorably in review. What have I learned from the ones on the lower end of the distribution?

    Here’s an idea. It can’t explain everything, but it’s something to avoid.

    Some biologists are question people — a particular question or issue unifies their research agenda. Others are organism or biome people — their work is unified by a particular taxon or a particular place. (And some people aren’t so easily categorized, of course.)

    For example, some people might work on mating systems, or fire ecology, or geographic distributions, working with a variety of model systems. Other people might work on bees, or rocky intertidal zones, or poppies — and they could be working on a broad variety of conceptual issues.

    This isn’t a bad thing. Some of us just have our affinities. It’s...

    Read the full article.
  • via rachwigg from Sweet Tea, Science
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    4 months 2 weeks ago

    Last year, maybe October, I was listening to an episode of the She Explores Podcast.  The guest spoke about the role of social media in her work in a way that really struck me.  The analogy was basically this:  social media is a window into our lives, and we control the size of that window.  People want to peek in, but if you make the window too big, you might make folks uncomfortable.  If we make the window too small, it may fail to serve our purposes.  I’ve been walking around with this tidbit in my shoe for months.  How big is my window?  Have I made it too big for online platforms I strive to keep more professional (Twitter, Tumblr, this blog)?

    Then, last week, two Twitter hashtags caught on pretty much simultaneously.  #...

    Read the full article.
  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    4 months 2 weeks ago

    FYI: Dynamic Ecology is now ad-free. The cost is minimal, so I figured what the heck. Plus, I like WordPress and want them to continue to exist (not that I have any specific reason to worry that they won’t), so I’m happy to send a bit of cash their way.


    Filed under: Announcements and events ... Read the full article.
  • via Terry McGlynn from Small Pond Science
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    4 months 2 weeks ago

    Alan Townsend wrote an op-ed that I think you really need to read: Science might save my daughter. Don’t kill it. (And in his blog, which I absolutely love and have linked to on previous occasions, he explains why he wrote the piece.)

    Science censorship is a global issue – a short letter to Nature written by three Aussie ecologists.

    Unlearning descriptive statistics. I thought this was really interesting. It makes the case that a lot of the descriptive statistics we use are there essentially because they’re the...

    Read the full article.
  • via Amy Parachnowitsch from Small Pond Science
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    4 months 2 weeks ago

    I’ve been working on Penstemon digitalis for a long time now. I first met the plant as a starting PhD student looking for a new system to make my own. I wanted something local (to Ithaca, NY), a plant that was dependent on pollinators with pre-dispersal seed predators (those are insects that lay eggs in the fruit and the young larvae eat the seeds). I wanted to study conflicting selection on floral traits by mutualists and antagonists, not what my dissertation ended up being about but that is a story for another day. In my search for a species to work with, I also wanted something with larger seeds than Lobelia siphilitica that I had just spent my masters cursing over and to be taller than Collinsia parviflora that I broke my back over during my undergrad.

    ...

    Read the full article.
  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    4 months 2 weeks ago

    Earlier this year I had the privilege of serving on the ASN Jasper Loftus-Hill Young Investigator Award (YIA) committee, along with Rebecca Safran (Chair) and Luke Harmon. The award goes to investigators less than 3 years post-Ph.D., or in the final year of their Ph.D., for promising, outstanding research in any field covered by the ASN. Four awards are given annually. The award is in memory of Jasper Loftus-Hill, a promising young scientist who died tragically 3 years after receiving his Ph.D.

    First of all, congratulations to the winners: Anna Hargreaves, Sarah Fitzpatrick, Alison Wright, and Martha Muñoz. We had 25 applicants (15 women, 10 men), all of them excellent, so we...

    Read the full article.
  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    4 months 3 weeks ago

    If you’re a very avid reader of this blog, you need to get a life will know that I’m writing a book about ecology. It’s for University of Chicago Press. The working title is “Ecology At Work”, though that’s only one of several candidate titles. Other candidate titles include “Ecology Master Class”, “Re-engineering Ecology”, and the joke titles that I and others tweeted recently.

    Anyway, I’m very excited by this new challenge I’ve set myself, and also very nervous that I can pull it off. Which is where you come in. Below the fold is a draft introduction to my book. Please tear it apart.

    Ok, don’t just tear it apart; any and all feedback is most welcome. But critical feedback and suggestions for improvement are particularly welcome. If you think the style sucks, or that the book sounds boring,...

    Read the full article.
  • via Terry McGlynn from Small Pond Science
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    4 months 3 weeks ago

    I don’t remember my New Faculty Orientation that well. Why is that?

    I’ve done this a few times. Each time, I was excited, exhausted, and overwhelmed. I had just moved to a new city. I was dealing with finding new housing, moving all of my stuff, getting finances in order, helping combobulate my spouse’s professional situation, and the most recent time I was dealing with a kid getting adjusted.

    The professional side was a hurricane, too. I was gearing up to teach a new class. I had a research lab to set up. I had a brand new set of colleagues, my office had someone else’s stuff in it, my new computer hadn’t shown up yet, I didn’t know where any basic stuff was.

    You know what would really help at this moment in time? How about locking me in a room with other professors for a whole day or three to tell us every single thing we needed know about being a professor at this university.

    I hope you know that previous sentence...

    Read the full article.
  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    4 months 3 weeks ago

    Also this week: Michael Eisen plans to run for Senate, honoring ecologists, Princeton Monographs seeks women authors, and more.

    From Jeremy:

    An interesting remark from Andrew Gelman:

    Why am I so sure that effect sizes will be low in the absence of theory? Because there are just too many things to look at. Without theory (or effective intuition or heuristics, which are just informal versions of theory), you’re basically picking potential effects at random, and most potential effects are small.

    From Meg:

    Cognitive bias cheat sheet. It has lots of detailed info on different biases, and this summary near the end:

    ...

    Read the full article.
  • via Meghan Duffy from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    4 months 3 weeks ago

    Applicants are currently being sought for NextProf Science, a workshop aimed at future faculty (advanced doctoral students or postdoctoral fellows) who are interested in an academic career in science and who have demonstrated a commitment to diversity. The workshop is May 2-5, 2017 in Ann Arbor, MI.

    At NextProf Science, participants learn:

    • how the faculty search process works
    • how to build successful research programs
    • how to form a teaching and mentoring philosophy
    • why a network is important

    The NextProf Science 2017 workshop is free to participants, who must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents. Underrepresented minorities and women are especially encouraged to apply. Travel, lodging, and meals will be covered by the program.

    Applicants may nominate themselves or be nominated by a faculty mentor. Find additional information about the workshop and application materials on the NextProf Science website at:...

    Read the full article.

Pages

Powered by Drupal | Theme modified by Naupaka Zimmerman from Danland by Danetsoft | | INNGE is supported through a collaboration with INTECOL