You are here

EcoBloggers


EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via Terry McGlynn from Small Pond Science
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    9 months 2 weeks ago

    I’d like to tell you a story about speaking out.

    We are hearing more in the media from targets of sexual misconduct.

    I hope we’re working towards a new environment, that when sexual misconduct happens, it’s big news because it’s both rare and widely regarded as unacceptable. We’re not there. It’s a long, long way to go.

    I suspect that things are ever so slightly better than a decade ago. Extraordinarily unacceptable behavior still might be commonplace, but an extreme situation in academia now might be considered newsworthy.

    A miniscule proportion of egregious cases of sexual misconduct have splashed into the media. Since February, a couple newer cases much closer to my academic fields have cropped up. In one, an entomologist who...

    Read the full article.
  • via Catherine Scott from Small Pond Science
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    9 months 3 weeks ago

    I have been going to entomology meetings (including those of the Entomological Societies of Canada (ESC), British Columbia (ESBC), and Ontario (ESO)) yearly since I started studying spiders in 2010 (we don’t have an arachnological society in Canada, so for these societies spiders are welcomed as honorary insects) and I went to my first International Society of Arachnology (ISA) meeting in Colorado this past summer. I’ve met a lot of ecologists and evolutionary biologists who study insects or spiders who do not attend entomology or arachnology conferences (this may also be true for other taxa but these are the communities I am familiar with). It turns out that I am unusual among my current colleagues in that I happily self-identify as an arachnologist/entomologist as well as...

    Read the full article.
  • via Terry McGlynn from Small Pond Science
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    9 months 4 weeks ago

    A couple truly spectacular reads have already made the rounds in social media in the last week, but in case you haven’t caught them, be sure to do so:

    First, the Washington Post published a long-form piece about Derek Black, former media star of white nationalists who grew to repudiate his views. How did this happen? The free exchange of ideas and mutual respect found in higher education. If you’re looking for a defense of a liberal arts education (which can be found in potentially any university), then this might be as great as it gets.

    Second, the Arizona Republic editorial staff received many death threats because they endorsed a particular...

    Read the full article.
  • via Terry McGlynn from Small Pond Science
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    10 months 1 day ago

    I think a lot of academic article titles are pretty bad. What do I mean by bad? The title doesn’t really tell you what the paper is actually is about. It could be buried in jargon, or overselling an idea, or focuses on details that most of the intended audience won’t care about.

    Does the title of a paper affect how it gets read and cited? Probably. In what way? That’s not so simple, based on my short browse of some scientometric findings.

    In medical journals, the longer your title is, the more you get cited. And there also a positive effect of using a colon before a subtitle, as in the title of this post. If you’re specific about a particular country, that hurts your citation rate.

    In the journal Functional Ecology, you get cited more if you don’t mention the kind of organism you’re...

    Read the full article.
  • via EcoEvo@TCD from EcoEvo@TCD
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    10 months 1 day ago

    In 1993 Free Willy leapt onto cinema screens around the world. The story about a young boy who saves a killer whale from a run-down theme park was an instant hit for Warner Bros. However for Keiko, the whale who played Willy, the story did not have a Hollywood ending. While Willy jumped to freedom as the credits rolled, Keiko remained in captivity. What followed was a global effort to return Keiko to the wild at all costs, even to Keiko himself.

    Keiko, a male killer whale (Orcinus orca), was born in the North Atlantic off Iceland, sometime between 1977 and 1978. His life took a strange turn when in 1979 he was captured and sent to the Icelandic aquarium in Hafnarfjörður. He was then sold to Marineland of Canada Inc. in 1982 and moved to Ontario, joining a small group of other killer whales. Finally, Keiko was sold to the amusement park Reino Aventura in Mexico City in 1985, for $350,000. While in Mexico Keiko lived alone in an approximately 500,000-gallon...

    Read the full article.
  • via Terry McGlynn from Small Pond Science
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    10 months 3 days ago

    The national SACNAS conference came through LA again. SACNAS is an organization that fosters diversity in higher education and runs a huge national conference each year. The organization does other things, but the national conference is clearly a focal point.

    SACNAS has been described as a “mentoring conference.” From what I’ve seen, that’s a good description. There is no shortage of actual science — from astronomy to ecology to biochemistry to other stuff — but there is not going to be a ton of science in your own speciality. The focus of the meeting is to prepare students to succeed in careers in science. Undergrads tend to give posters on their research and grad students tend to give talks. And there are a lot of panels and symposia about navigating your path over and around the may obstacles that are placed in front of minority scientists.

    For students who...

    Read the full article.
  • via EcoEvo@TCD from EcoEvo@TCD
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    10 months 3 days ago

    Professor William Campbell with Professors Celia Holland (front right) and Yvonne Buckley (front left). Back row L-R Professor Holland’s parasitology research group: Dr Peter Stuart, Gwen Deslyper, Maureen Williams, Rachael Byrne and Paula Tierney

     

    “Parasites are not generally regarded as being loveable. When we refer to people as parasites we are not being...

    Read the full article.
  • via Terry McGlynn from Small Pond Science
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    10 months 1 week ago

    Yesterday, I received an epic comment on a recent post of mine about minority recruitment. I want to share it:

    This fits my experience so so well. I am first gen American, started at community college, transferred to a good public university and struggled but ultimately graduated with a 3.2 GPA and did OK on GREs. Had zero “social capital” (and had no idea what that was). I was lucky to have a TA (PhD student) who took me under her wing and had me volunteer in her lab a few hours a week and an excellent professor in my last quarter who informed me about internships and helped me secure one specifically targeting minority students (and it was paid!). Anyhow, after gaining a lot of experience though field jobs , I applied and was rejected from many PhD programs and...

    Read the full article.
  • via Terry McGlynn from Small Pond Science
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    10 months 1 week ago

    Without tenure, professors become terrified sheep.

    The terrorist inside my husband’s brain. This piece by Robin Williams’s widow, written for practicing neurologists, is an important read for all of us.

    Why people wince at talk of “flipping classrooms.” This phrase has pretty much lost any specific meaning or utility, and that’s why I haven’t really used it. I’m a fan of active learning approaches but not a fan of flipping sensu stricto.

    Here’s a story explaining how classrooms are being designed differently...

    Read the full article.
  • via Terry McGlynn from Small Pond Science
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    10 months 2 weeks ago

Pages

Powered by Drupal | Theme modified by Naupaka Zimmerman from Danland by Danetsoft | | INNGE is supported through a collaboration with INTECOL