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EcoBloggers


EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via Matthew Dray from THE ROSTRUM | Ecology, Entomology, Statistics and Science Policy
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 years 6 months ago

    Update: EcoFluxx has now been repackaged as Nature Fluxx

    Ecologist? Check. Enjoy card games? Check. Why not play EcoFluxx to celebrate your membership of this niche subculture?

    EcoFluxx is an ecology-themed version of Fluxx: “the card game with ever-changing rules” by Looney Labs. Simply put, you draw and play cards featuring organisms and environmental features, then create winning combinations that represent ecological processes, taxonomic groupings and so on.

    ... Read the full article.
  • via downwithtime from downwithtime
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 years 7 months ago

    If you’ve ever been in doubt about whether you chose the right programming language to learn I want to lay those concerns to rest here.

    For many scientists, particularly in Biology or the Earth Sciences, there is often a question about whether you should be learning R, Python, Matlab or something else.  Especially when you’re coming into scientific programming in grad school with little prior experience this might seem like a daunting proposal.  You already don’t know anything about anything, and ultimately you wind up learning whatever you’re taught, or whatever your advisor is using and you wonder. . . Is the grass greener over in Python-land? Those figures look nice, if only I had learned R. . . Why did I learn on an expensive closed platform?

    I am here to say “Don’t worry about it”, and I want to emphasize that with an example centered around academic outreach:

    The Neotoma...

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  • via downwithtime from downwithtime
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 years 7 months ago

    I am by no means an expert on the subject of under-representation in the sciences.  There are some excellent academic bloggers who have done some great work in discussing issues around race and gender in academia (including DNLee, the tweeters at and using #BlackandSTEM – EDIT: this is an amazing post by Dr. Chanda Prescod-Weinstein over at medium.com).  This post is intended to highlight what I’ve observed and experienced over the past year or so, with a specific observation surrounding the EarthCube Early Career Travel Grant.

    The issue of diversity is tricky in...

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  • via adrianadepalma from THE ROSTRUM | Ecology, Entomology, Statistics and Science Policy
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 years 8 months ago

    I’m approaching thesis write-up mania.

    Actually, I’ve been approaching it for a while, but with the mania also comes self-delusion. I figured that a very productive way to put off writing would be to learn LaTeχ, a document preparation system that has many advantages over word processors for scientific publications. In particular, snippets of R code can be integrated to provide self-updating outputs in the document (magic!). I told myself that this would undoubtedly save me time later on. For once, this procrastination actually worked out pretty well.

    So, I’m going to share with you a quick guide on how I’ve been using tool called Sweave in RStudio (.Rnw...

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  • via adrianadepalma from THE ROSTRUM | Ecology, Entomology, Statistics and Science Policy
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 years 11 months ago
  • via Matthew Dray from THE ROSTRUM | Ecology, Entomology, Statistics and Science Policy
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 years 8 months ago

    For the past few years, I have been sent questions about ‘minibeasts’ (small invertebrates and vertebrates) from a class of four- and five-year-olds. Some questions are simple, some are surprisingly developed. But there are also questions – perfectly innocent questions – that have caused me existential crises. ‘Why do moths die?’ is one of these.

    Encouraging inquisitions about the natural world is imperative. Batting away a child’s question can be harmful: Leather and Quicke (2010) highlighted that a lack of natural history comprehension may threaten the future of our environment. Misunderstandings could result in a lack of interest and appreciation, diverting students from a very rewarding area of study. Fortunately, help is at hand: teachers can rely on a wealth of...

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  • via The Rostrum from THE ROSTRUM | Ecology, Entomology, Statistics and Science Policy
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 years 10 months ago

    Many people use spreadsheets for data entry. This is no surprise. But some go further, using them as a tool for – shudder! – data manipulation. It may be better to manage your spreadsheet via an R script instead. Why might you want to do this?

    • Accidental typing. Changing a cell’s value by mistake could, at best, have you scratching your head; at worst, your statistical analysis will be wrong. This is a very real problem for people with gigantic fingers/cats (the cats are not necessarily gigantic).
    • Sorting. If you forget to highlight a column when sorting data, the rows could become mismatched.
    • Ditching data. You might decide to delete data that are later unrecoverable, or you cut some values and forget to paste them (we’ve all been there).
    • Poor formulation. Errors in...
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  • via Matthew Dray from THE ROSTRUM | Ecology, Entomology, Statistics and Science Policy
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    4 years 1 month ago

    A bug-specialist Pokémon trainer and a Caterpie (Nintendo)

    Satoshi Tajiri was a Japanese boy with a passion for catching arthropods. He went on to become the creator of one of the most successful videogame franchises of all time. The link between these two sentences is not obvious until you realise that Tajiri was the creator of Pokémon. His experiences of...

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