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EcoBloggers


EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via freshwaterblog from The BioFresh blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 weeks ago

    The European eel is one of the continent’s most remarkable and wide-ranging aquatic animals. Young eels (known as elvers) are born in the Sargasso Sea in the West Atlantic Ocean, and migrate back to European watercourses. Here, they mature and grow larger over a number of years, before making the journey back to the Sargasso Sea to spawn themselves.

    However, European eel populations are subject to considerable threats. Some eel populations have dropped by over 90% across the continent in recent decades, largely as the result of overfishing and habitat loss. The European eel has been designated as ‘Critically Endangered’ by the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species since 2008 as a result.

    A new community-engaged animation has sought...

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  • via Meghan Duffy from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 weeks ago

    Last week, I visited Washington DC for training as part of the AAAS Leshner Leadership Institute for Public Engagement. I spent the week with the other 14 incoming Leshner Leadership Fellows, learning about writing and pitching opinion pieces, storytelling, evaluating outreach, and much more. But perhaps the thing that was the most eye-opening for me was our trip to Capitol Hill, where we met with two staffers from the House Energy & Commerce Committee as well as several staffers from the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, & Pensions (HELP). Prior to going, we got a tutorial from some AAAS folks on policy engagement fundamentals. In this post, I’ll go over the policy engagement fundamentals that I...

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  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 weeks ago

    Evolution 2017 starts in in a couple of days, and #ESA2017 is coming up soon after that! We have a local lined up to write a guest post for us about where to eat and drink in Portland for #ESA2017, but in the meantime: been anywhere good? Tell us, and your many hungry and thirsty colleagues, in the comments!

    I’ll start: McMenamins Kennedy School is worth the car ride. It’s a historic elementary school that’s been converted into a boutique hotel and brewpub. My wife and I stayed there a few years ago. You have to see it to believe it, it’s such a cool place. Every nook and cranny is put to use. There are several bars, each with its own funky decor; even the boiler room is a (cozy) bar now. The auditorium is now a theater that features classic movies and live music. You can eat and drink outside in the courtyard in the center of the school. The walls are...

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  • via ebach from Beneath Our Feet: the GSBI Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 weeks ago
    By Dietrich Epp Schmidt, Graduate Reserach Assistant, University of Maryland

    “Even the mightiest of us return to dust, they say. Nothing remains but these shattered fragments of their kingdom… But that's not really the point, is it? These shattered fragments remain- that's the point. We look upon the magnificent temples and stelae and ball courts of Caracol in awe. There's no despair here. The Maya built something astounding and permanent. Look on our works, ye mighty, and revere. The ancient Maya speak to the twenty-first century through those temples and say: We did something amazing here.

    What will our descendants think when they come upon Chalillo [dam]? When they scrape away the deep layer of dirt covering its stepping-stone facade, what will they make of the dogleg design, the Chinese gauges, the long-stopped turbines? What will they make of the skeletons and fossils of birds long gone? Will they connect the two?"

     

    -Bruce Barcott, The last...

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  • via admin from BRIT Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 weeks ago
    Our”Cabinet Curiosities” series explores significant items in our Herbarium collection. This article was written by Haley Rylander, Research and Herbarium Assistant. The New Zealand Kauri – Agathis australis – is a truly magnificent tree, revered in New Zealand by the … Continue reading → Read the full article.
  • via noreply@blogger.com (Caroline Tucker) from The EEB & Flow
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 weeks ago
    The niche concept is a good example of an idea in ecology that is continually changing. It is probably the most important idea in ecology that no one has yet nailed down. As most histories of the niche mention, the niche has developed from its first mention by Grinnell (in 1917) to Hutchinson’s multi-dimensional niche space, to mechanistic descriptions of resource usage and R*s (from MacArthur’s warblers to Tilman’s algae). Its most recent incarnation can be found in what has been called modern coexistence theory, as first proposed by Peter Chesson in his seminal 2000 paper.

    Chesson’s mathematical framework has come to dominate a lot of discussion amongst community ecologists, with good reason. It provides a clear way to understand stable coexistence amongst local populations in terms of their ability to recover... Read the full article.
  • via Amy Padfield from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 weeks ago

    Time and time again academics cite the role of mentors in helping them progress in their careers, and mentoring has been shown to be particularly formative for women. I myself am extremely lucky in that I have had brilliant mentors guiding and supporting me throughout my academic career. In some cases, I’m not sure they realised they were mentoring me, in others it is only with the wisdom of hindsight that I realised they mentored me. Thank goodness, then, there are increasing numbers of formal mentoring schemes available, not least including the BES Mentoring Scheme for Women in Ecology.

    Recognition of the importance of mentors in my own career progression, was one of the reasons that I applied for the first time to be a mentor on the scheme last summer. I wasn’t entirely sure what to expect. I think I assumed my role would mainly be advising my mentee in career progression. Possibly there would be some discussion of work-life balance. Maybe more ‘controversial’ topics such...

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  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 weeks ago

    A while back I asked for suggestions for “lab lit”: novels featuring scientists and scientific themes, that a scientist would enjoy. That last caveat is crucial: many fictional scientists ring true only to non-scientists.

    And boy did our commenters come through in spades! I’ve been working my way through some of the suggestions from the post. Here are brief, mostly spoiler-free reviews of five of them: The Southern Reach trilogy, All The Birds In The Sky, and Ordinary Thunderstorms.

    The Southern Reach Trilogy (Annihilation, Authority, Acceptance) by Jeff VanderMeer. The tv show Lost (or a David Lynch movie) meets...

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  • via djgibson from Journal of Ecology blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 weeks ago
    The latest issue of Journal of Ecology (105:4) includes a Special Feature reviewing how plant ecological research can contribute to Global Food Security. Below, Senior Editors, David Gibson and Richard Bardgett tell us more about their Special Feature.  A burgeoning human population coupled with ongoing climate change is precipitating a global food security crisis. By… Read the full article.
  • via dinoverm from Parasite Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 weeks ago
    If you’re a frequent follower of this blog, you’ll remember a recent post series discussing how the definition of the term “vector” is not universal; different people/fields use different definitions. That surprised me, but not as much as a recent … Continue reading → Read the full article.

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