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EcoBloggers


EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • from Nature's Confluence
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 weeks 1 day ago
    Mark Schwartz  There are a bunch of books on science and the ivory tower and how scientists need to actively paticipate in reversing the pattern of scientists isolating themselves from public discourse. There are also a bunch of books on scientific illiteracy that speak to the need to increase the generaly understanding of science among people.  Conservation Science (CS) and Natural Resource Manaement (NRM) are ideal participants in this important venture to build a populace that acknowledges science as an important way of knowing; that there are rules to to good science; that we individually can and should look to science and judge whether what we read meets the criteria of good science and not let some website dictate to us whether some scientific finding is valid, important, trivial or malicously false. I believe that CS... Read the full article.
  • via Manu Saunders from Ecology is Not a Dirty Word
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 weeks 2 days ago
    Field ecology experiments are fickle. Even with best laid plans in place, they can fail…Nature doesn’t follow sampling protocols. When this happens, should you publish the results? Most people would say no, and I would generally agree. Failed experiments are… Read the full article.
  • via noreply@blogger.com (David Steen) from Living Alongside Wildlife
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 weeks 2 days ago
    Good morning, This snake was seen yesterday in Sandy Springs, a northern suburb of Atlanta. Initially, I was felt certain that it was a young cottonmouth based mostly on the eye stripe, how it is holding its head, and its girth. I am aware that cottonmouths can have a greyish phase, but the banding isn't exactly what I expected and Atlanta is supposedly outside their range. Of course,
  • from Next Succession
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 weeks 3 days ago
    ...un experimento en los cerros de Mundo Nuevo, un eco hostal y finca en Minca, Colombia.  Cuales arboles locales pueden crecer desde este el metodo de estacas?  Cuales pueden ayudarnos en la guerra contra el pasto invasivo?
    En este página hay algunos repuestos sobre de este experimento.




    Porque estacas?Lo es un metodo rapido y facil, que no requiere nada por obono, ni agua, ni huecos tan grandes (profundidad de 50cm y anchura de un huecador), por reforestal de áreas mas amplias.
    ... Read the full article.
  • via freshwaterblog from The BioFresh blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 weeks 4 days ago

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    Environmental decision-makers across Europe are continually faced with difficult decisions about how to target effective management and policy measures that conserve and restore the continent’s freshwater ecosystems. One means of valuing the effects of different measures is through the ecosystem service framework, through which attempts are made to quantify the multiple benefits humans obtain from ecosystems.

    DESSIN, a European water research project, has recently shared details of its ‘Ecosystem Services Evaluation Framework‘, which is designed to help decision makers evaluate the effectiveness of new and innovative water management measures in ensuring water quality and quantity in urban areas.

    The...

    Read the full article.
  • via noreply@blogger.com (Caroline Tucker) from The EEB & Flow
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 weeks 4 days ago
    Not many seminar speakers are introduced with a discussion of their pipetting skills. When we talk about other scientists we discuss their intelligence, their rigour, their personality, above and beyond their learned skills. Most people have an image of what a scientist should be, and judge themselves against this idealized vision. There are a lot of unspoken messages that are exchanged in science and academia. It’s easy to think that the successful scientists around one interacts with are just innately intelligent, confident, passionate, and hard-working. No doubt imposter syndrome owes a lot to this one-sided internalization of the world. After all, you don’t feel like you fulfill these characteristics because you have evidence of your own personal struggles but not those of everyone else. 
    ...
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  • via Camilla Morrison-Bell from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 weeks 4 days ago

    The main themes included the impact of Brexit on environmental legislation; energy and climate change; improving upon the Common Agricultural Policy; balancing an increasing housing need with protecting the environment and finally how to encourage more people to get involved in the green movement. One key area missing from the discussion was the marine environment.

    Clive Anderson (TV and radio presenter and president of The Woodland Trust) chaired the panel that was composed of:

    • Dr Thérèse Coffey, Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for the Environment and Rural Life Opportunities, Conservative parliamentary candidate for Suffolk Coastal
    • Baroness Kate Parminter, Liberal Democrat spokesperson for environment, food,  and rural affairs
    • Barry Gardiner, Shadow Secretary of State for International Trade and Shadow Minister for Climate Change, and Labour parliamentary candidate for Brent North...
    Read the full article.
  • via Kirsty Lucas from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 weeks 4 days ago

    With their publication, the scientist agree with recommendations of FAO to included cover crops in rotations, on top of that they open new avenues for the design of good species mixtures. Their advice: chose a mixture of winter cover crops which is productive and high in nitrogen, avoid the succession of closely related crops.

    Biomass and nitrogen concentration, those are the keywords for a successful application of winter cover crop mixtures. The positive effects of cover crops on soil quality is recognised for some time now, however how the potential benefits of mixtures over monoculture cover crops relate to the mixture composition received little attention to date.

    Soil legacy

    The soil legacies of plants are two-fold. On the one hand, nutrients released from plant residues through decomposition influence...

    Read the full article.
  • via Journal of Applied Ecology from The Applied Ecologist's blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 weeks 4 days ago
    In this post, Janna Barel shares thoughts on the legacies plants leave, the benefits of cover crops and insights from her recent Journal of Applied Ecology paper, Legacy effects of diversity in space and time driven by winter cover crop biomass and nitrogen concentration. Janna has also included a Dutch translation of this post. Journal of […] Read the full article.
  • via Adrian Paterson from EcoLincNZ
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 weeks 4 days ago

    The Nuggets are a magical place. (Image from Adrian Paterson)

    One of my favorite places is the Catlins, a wild area of dripping bush, rugged southerlies, untouched beaches, and abundant wildlife in the far south-east South Island. There are some great spots within the Catlins, but the one I go back to time after time is The Nuggets. This area is a peninsula at the north end of the Catlins, that gives some protection to the swimming beaches of Kaka Point from weather and waves that roll in straight from the...

    Read the full article.

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