You are here

EcoBloggers


EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via ebach from Beneath Our Feet: the GSBI Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 1 day ago
    By Ryan Klopf (Virginia Dept. Conservation and Recreation), Sara Baer (Southern Illinois University Carbondale), Elizabeth Bach (Colorado State University), and Johan Six (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology)

     

    “Prairie was, in fact, a community of plants and animals so organized as to build, through the centuries, the rich soil which now feeds us.”  -Aldo Leopold, Prairie: The Forgotten Flora (1942)*




    Tallgrass prairie restorations planted with high plant diversity (left) and low plant diversity (right)
    Photo credit: Ryan Klopf


    The tallgrass prairie of the U.S. Midwest is one of the most endangered ecosystems in the world, with >99% of the ecosystem converted to cultivation in some states.  Restoring farmland in the Midwest back to tallgrass prairie has been of public interest since the days of Aldo Leopold.  Much of this restoration work,...

    Read the full article.
  • from Next Succession
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 2 days ago

    Finca Omoki.
    I've been here before, sitting under a tin roof, dogs barking.  It's third-world hot.  Deva ju.  A local is explaining which  world politics have made his country so poor and mine so rich.  In Fredy Moreno's case, he says Colombian researchers forfeit intellectual property under the free trade agreement with the US.  His work as a biologist would likely benefit a foreign power rather than his own people.  ... Read the full article.
  • via NREL EcoPress from NREL EcoPress
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 2 days ago

    By Nell Campbell

    • How do changes in grazed pasture management affect soil carbon and nitrogen cycling?
    • How do these changes affect the environmental impacts of the resulting agricultural products (i.e. meat, milk)?
    • Should some pasture areas be managed differently, or be used to produce something else entirely?

    These three questions form the core of two research efforts that I currently have the luck and opportunity to bridge, building connections based on two key commonalities: (1) the focus on pasture systems, and (2) the representation of new understanding in process-based models for soil and plant carbon and nitrogen in order to scale between field experiments and larger temporal and spatial dynamics.

    Pastures play a key role in the mosaic of agricultural land use for feed, food, fuel, and fiber production. Pasture systems are also central to questions of land use change, sustainable agroecosystem management, and understanding-...

    Read the full article.
  • via Chris Grieves from methods.blog (Methods in Ecology and Evolution)
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 2 days ago
    Post provided by Theoni Photopoulou “Movement is the glue that ties ecological processes together” from Francesca Cagnacci et al. 2010 Movement ecology is a cross-disciplinary field. Its main aim is to quantitatively describe and understand how movement relates to individual and … Continue reading → Read the full article.
  • via noreply@blogger.com (Caroline Tucker) from The EEB & Flow
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 2 days ago
    Bill Michener is a longtime advocate of data management and archiving practices for ecologists, and I was lucky to catch him giving talk on the topic this week. It clarified for me the value of formalizing data management plans for institutions and lab groups, but also the gap between recommendations for best practices in data management and the reality in many labs.

    Michener started his talk with two contrasting points. First, we are currently deluged by data. There is more data available to scientists now than ever, perhaps 45000 exabytes by 2020. On the other hand, scientific data is constantly lost. The longer since a paper is published, the less likely its data can be recovered (one study he cited showed that data had a half life of 20 years). There are many causes of data loss, some... Read the full article.
  • via Benjamin Blonder from Natural Curiosities
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 2 days ago

    Most people’s imagination of doing warm tropical landscapes involves charismatic megafauna. They are there, but they are not the primary experience of fieldwork. They shape the landscape deeply, but it can be a rare even to see them, especially up close.

    ...

    Read the full article.
  • via Journal of Applied Ecology from The Applied Ecologist's blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 2 days ago
    In the third of our posts in our series of blog posts for International Women’s Day we asked our Associate Editors about improvements they are seeing towards gender equality, new initiatives and any institution, department or person who deserves specific praise in this area. Nathalie Butt – I have seen big increases in awareness of, […] Read the full article.
  • via CJAB from Conservation Bytes
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 3 days ago
    Frog songs are species-specific and highly useful for the study of tropical communities, which host the highest amphibian diversities globally. The auditory system of females and the vocal system of males have co-evolved to facilitate reproductive encounters, but global warming might be disrupting the frequency of sound-based encounters in some species. ... Read the full article.
  • via Alex Bond from The Lab and Field
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 3 days ago

    I was going through my semi-regular update of my CV because, frankly, if I don’t I won’t be able to keep track of everything! It’s as much for me as it is for others (and arguably more so these days).

    Which got me thinking about grants, and how they’re recorded. On my CV, it’s a combination of year(s), project title, funding source, and grant amount. So far, all the grants that I’ve received have been one of two kinds:

    1. a grant / award for which I was the only applicant, like my two postdoc grants
    2. a grant where a small group (<5) of us wrote the application and got the funding

    These have all been relatively small, bar our work on Northern Rockhopper Penguins, which was funded by the Darwin Initiative to the tune of £200,000, but where each of the five project partners is involved in just about everything. But as I progress, I expect more and more I’ll be just one part of a bigger piece of work....

    Read the full article.
  • via Kate Harrison from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 3 days ago

    Wednesday 8 March 2017 is International Women’s Day, a global day to celebrate the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women. This year the theme is #BeBoldForChange which recognises the need to challenge bias and inequality, celebrate women’s achievements, champion women’s education and more.

    The BES journals are publishing a series of blog posts this week to celebrate the women who have and are shaping ecology. STEM (science, technology, engineering, medical) fields still have many challenges to overcome before achieving gender parity – can ecologists lead the way?

    Journal of Applied Ecology Associate Editors share their motivations for pursuing a career in science...

    Read the full article.

Pages

Powered by Drupal | Theme modified by Naupaka Zimmerman from Danland by Danetsoft | | INNGE is supported through a collaboration with INTECOL