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EcoBloggers


EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via Meghan Duffy from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 2 weeks ago

    Quick quiz! Let’s imagine you are reading the results section of a manuscript. Which of these is the most useful/interesting/compelling/informative?:

    1. Figure 2 shows the relationship between infection and lifespan.
    2. Our experiment on the relationship between infection and lifespan found unambiguous results (Figure 2).
    3. Including infection treatment as a predictor improved model fit for lifespan (stats, Figure 2).
    4. Infected hosts lived, on average, half as long as uninfected hosts (20 days vs. 40 days; stats, Figure 2).

    I think we’d mostly agree that option 4 is the most informative and interesting by a long shot. It focuses on the biological results, which, as ecologists, are usually our primary interest – presumably you did the experiment because you wanted to know whether and how infection impacted reproduction, not because you just really like making figures or doing stats!

    But, in my experience, it’s very common...

    Read the full article.
  • via Jerusha Brown from EcoLincNZ
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 2 weeks ago

    (Photo of fantail by Jon Sullivan, CC-BY_NC, www.flickr.com/photos/mollivan_jon/26851270492/)

    Jerusha Brown is in her final year of a Bachelor of Science majoring in Conservation and Ecology at Lincoln University. She spent the summer doing a research scholarship and tells us about one of her results.

    Fantails are one of the most common, well-loved native birds in our towns and cities. Their beautiful fan-shaped tail and friendly “meep” makes them hard to miss when trailing through the bush or city. With their “energetic flying antics” and prolific breeding habits, fantails have managed to avoid the threatened species list that so many indigenous species are on. However, despite their abundance, fantails...

    Read the full article.
  • via Meghan Duffy from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 2 weeks ago

    I recently had a conversation with someone who said he thinks the second year of a course is the best year and that, after three years, he wants to move on. But I’ve also had conversations with others who would be happy to teach the same course for eternity. And I know still others who initially wanted to teach the same course over and over and over, but who now prefer to switch more often.

    Part of why I’ve been having these conversations is I’ve been thinking lately about how long I want to teach Introductory Biology, even though I’m not sure how much of an option I have in terms of how long I will teach it for – I don’t think I’d be forced to if I said I absolutely didn’t want to do it, but there is definitely pressure to stay in it. But, for reasons I’ll explain more below, I’ve been thinking a lot lately about how many times is the “right” number of times to teach a course and whether that number changes over the course of one’s career.

    So, let’s start out with a...

    Read the full article.
  • via CJAB from Conservation Bytes
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 2 weeks ago
    I’ve just read an excellent paper that succinctly, eloquently, and wisely summarised the current predicament of our highly interconnected, global, complex adaptive system (i.e., our environment). If you are new to the discussions around state shifts, hysteresis, tipping points, and system collapse, there might be a lot in the new paper by Philip Garnett of […] ... Read the full article.
  • via Terry McGlynn from Small Pond Science
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 weeks ago
    Today, the House Committee on Science had a hearing about sexual harassment. The whole thing is worth your time, but holy moly there were two moments in particular, 6 minutes of your time, that I feel compelled to share: First, Dr. Kate Clancy delivered testimony on what sexual harassment is, and how deep and pervasive… Read the full article.
  • via James Ross from Journal of Ecology blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 weeks ago
    Hugo Saiz (Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Spain) tells us more about his recently published Journal of Ecology article about plant spatial association networks across dryland ecosystems… Not surprisingly, the use of networks has increased considerably in community ecology in recent years. Network analysis allows studying ecological communities as a whole while providing valuable information about… Read the full article.
  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 weeks ago

    Rarely. For details, read on.

    Junior applicants for faculty positions open to applicants of multiple ranks sometimes worry that senior applicants have a big advantage over junior applicants. Personally, I don’t think they do. Senior applicants are held to higher standards than junior applicants–a cv that is impressive for a postdoc is not impressive for an associate or full professor. Senior applicants also are more expensive to hire (higher salary, more startup), and there’s a greater risk that they’ll turn down the offer after negotiating a counter-offer from their current institution. Finally, senior candidates are “known quantities”, and many hiring institutions prefer the “potential” of junior candidates.

    But we don’t just have to rely on anecdotal impressions; we can look at data.

    A while back I googled publicly-available information, emailed colleagues and department chairs, and asked around...

    Read the full article.
  • via Terry McGlynn from Small Pond Science
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 weeks ago
    Let's say you review a manuscript that's been submitted to the Journal of Biological Stuff. You wrote a thorough review. Ultimately, that paper ends up getting rejected by JBS. Then  some time goes past, and you are asked to review what appears to be the same manuscript, by the editor of Proceedings of Biological Stuff. What to do?
  • via Terry McGlynn from Small Pond Science
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 weeks ago
    Got milk, must conference Bioinformatics skills – How to get them and not get scared Being an academic after experiencing personal catastrophe How do we ensure the future of our discipline is vibrant? Student reflections on careers and culture of ecology   A Systematic Look at a Serial Problem: Sexual Harassment of Students by University Faculty… Read the full article.
  • via James Ross from Journal of Ecology blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 weeks ago
    Northern Arizona University press release – written by Kerry Bennett (Office of the Vice President for Research) The complex Serengeti ecosystem, which spans 12,000 square miles extending from northern Tanzania into southwestern Kenya, is home to millions of animals, including 70 species of large mammals. It is a hotspot for mammal diversity—including herbivores such as wildebeest,… Read the full article.

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