You are here

EcoBloggers


EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via Terry McGlynn from Small Pond Science
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 2 weeks ago

    At this writing, I’m halfway through a break to rest and recharge. It’s been quite pleasant.

    I’ve had a lot of quiet time with family, playing games and such. I got through all of Theodore Rex, Edmund Morris’s account of Roosevelt’s almost-eight-years in office*, and now am well into Philip Pullman’s followup to His Dark Materials series, which is cracking. And spending time in a snowy place is a nice rarity for an Angeleno.

    The last few months were a recalibration from my year-long sabbatical. I’m still finding my feet after getting back, as I adjust to new priorities, which has been slower than I’ve hoped for. But I see a bunch of manuscripts and new projects in the near future that reflect my new priorities.

    2017 was a disaster for people in the United States and those affected by us, and there’s no sign that...

    Read the full article.
  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 weeks ago

    A final reminder to ASN Jasper Loftus-Hills Young Investigator Awards applicants: all applications and reference letters need to be emailed to jefox@ucalgary.ca by Jan. 1, 2018. I’m afraid that’s a firm deadline. The awardees need to be chosen by early Feb., and choosing the awardees is a big job for the committee. We can’t push back the deadline. And for the sake of fairness, I’m afraid we can’t grant ad hoc extensions to individual applicants or reference letter writers.

    We’re thrilled with the number and diversity of applications received so far, but many aren’t yet complete. Please make sure you get your application in by the deadline, and nudge your letter writers if necessary.


    Filed under: Uncategorized ... Read the full article.
  • via Meghan Duffy from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 weeks ago

    I just spent a few days of my semester break devouring Philip Pullman’s newest book, The Book of Dust: La Belle Sauvage (Amazon link, but supporting your local bookseller is great, if possible!) It’s the first book in a new trilogy that is a prequel to Pullman’s His Dark Materials trilogy. I listened to that trilogy while counting samples in grad school. Those books are among my all-time favorites*, so I was both excited and a little nervous about starting the new book. Could it possibly live up to my expectations?

    It did. I loved it. I can’t wait for the next book in the new trilogy, and think I’ll reread the original trilogy and La Belle Sauvage as I wait for the new book. If you were a fan of His Dark Materials and haven’t gotten the new book yet, you should!

    This made me wonder what...

    Read the full article.
  • via Alex Bond from The Lab and Field
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 weeks ago

    I’ve already done 2017 by the numbers, and inspired by Auriel Fournier, here are some goals for 2018, in no particular order…

     

    Get two long-languishing papers submitted. One is from my postdoc (and formed a pretty bit part of it), and the other is a long-standing collaboration that just needs some dedicated attention. I’m reminded of this lovely cartoon.

    ...

    Read the full article.
  • via EcoEvo@TCD from EcoEvo@TCD
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 weeks ago

    As the year draws to a close, we thought we’d reflect on a some of our favourite scientific papers from 2017. There were only five entrants this year, but representing a broad range of work from across ecology and evolution, as chosen by PhD students and postdoctoral researchers from the School of Natural Sciences. So, without further ado, here are the papers from 2017 being entered into the EcoEvo hall of fame:

    ...

    Read the full article.
  • via WildlifeSNPits from WildlifeSNPits
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 weeks ago

    Anna
    My favourite paper of 2017 was “Devil Tools & Tech: A Synergy of Conservation Research and Management Practice” (open access). This provides a great example of how to effectively bridge the “research-implementation gap” in conservation management. Instead of what could be called the “traditional model”, where scientists conduct and publish research, and only then engage with practitioners and policy makers, this paper provides a framework for integrating research and management questions into a scientific program from the start. The example provided is the management of the remaining wild and captive populations of the Tasmanian devil, which has been threatened in recent decades by devil facial tumour disease. I know of a few other programs that have adopted similar principles in the past, but it is great to see an accessible...

    Read the full article.
  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 weeks ago

    A few links for your holiday reading pleasure.

    From Jeremy:

    Conservation easements as a tax dodge for the wealthy. It seems the main issue is that the size of the tax write-off for granting one particular type of easement depends on rather arbitrary claims about how much the land would’ve been worth had it been developed. I know little of the issues here; discuss.

    A Darwinian theory of narrative fiction. I haven’t read it, but it looks interesting. (ht Brad DeLong).


    Filed under: Uncategorized... Read the full article.
  • via freshwaterblog from The BioFresh blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 weeks ago
    15908792958_d35dcd5aa6_b

    Water outflows from Fewston Reservoir, UK. Image: James Whitesmith | Flickr Creative Commons

    As the end of the year approaches, we’ve looked back over 2017 to collect 17 of our most popular posts on freshwater science, policy and conservation.

    It’s been the most successful year yet for the Freshwater Blog, with record numbers of visitors. Thanks, as always, for reading. You can keep up to date with our posts, and add your voice to the debate, through our Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn pages.

    The MARS project, which has investigated the interactions and impacts of multiple stressors on aquatic...

    Read the full article.
  • via James_Borrell from James Borrell
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 weeks ago

    What lessons does driving across Africa teach you? Humility; check. Patience; check. But most importantly; that pre-conceptions are almost always wrong.

    Beginning this journey I was most nervous about Zimbabwe. We’d heard horror stories of police, bribes and corruption. Aside from the odd officer trying to boost his pay packet (after all, they’re chronically poorly paid), it turned out to be one of our favorite countries. The variety of habitats within its borders is spectacular. Six months later, it has even shaken itself free of Mugabe’s clutches. I can’t wait to see it blossom.

    Turn then to Mozambique. As we trundled down Tanzania I was nervous. Were we being brave or foolhardy in trying...

    Read the full article.
  • from Next Succession
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 weeks ago


    Contents
    Part 1. Semi-arid/Scrub*          -Trees        -Shrubs and other plants        -Non-NativesPart 2. Temperate Forest*        -Trees        -Shrubs and other plants        -Non-Natives
    Click any image to enlarge.  Use ctrl+f to search trees by name.Trees and info to be added as I travel through... Read the full article.

Pages

Powered by Drupal | Theme modified by Naupaka Zimmerman from Danland by Danetsoft | | INNGE is supported through a collaboration with INTECOL