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EcoBloggers


EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via jeffollerton from Jeff Ollerton
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 3 days ago
  • via James Ross from Journal of Ecology blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 3 days ago
    Wednesday 8 March 2017 is International Women’s Day, a global day to celebrate the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women. Needless to say, at Journal of Ecology we’d like to give particular mention to the scientific achievements of women as well. International Women’s Day also marks a call to action for accelerating gender… Read the full article.
  • via Meghan Duffy from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 3 days ago

    A while back, there was a twitter discussion related to Associate Editors (AEs) sending manuscripts back out for review when the changes are pretty minor. One part of the discussion indicated that there’s some variation in interpretation of the “Would you be able to review a revised version of this manuscript?” question. This topic recently came up again in some emails between Brian, Jeremy, and me (and then again on twitter after I mentioned writing a post on it), so I figured it’s worth a quick poll:

    Take Our Poll (function(d,c,j){if(!d.getElementById(j)){var pd=d.createElement(c),s;pd.id=j;pd.src='https://s1.wp.com/wp-content/mu-plugins/shortcodes/js/polldaddy-shortcode.js';s=d.getElementsByTagName(c)[0];s.parentNode.insertBefore(pd,s);} else if(typeof jQuery !=='undefined')jQuery(d.body).trigger('pd-script-load');}(document,'script','pd-polldaddy-loader'));

    (...

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  • via GrrlScientist, Contributor from GrrlScientist
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 3 days ago
    The giant panda's black and white markings are unique in the animal kingdom so the reason for this particular color pattern has remained mysterious -- until now
  • via Chris Grieves from methods.blog (Methods in Ecology and Evolution)
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 3 days ago
    Post provided by Nibedita Mukherjee Women in academia are special. This isn’t because of their abundance and diversity (or lack of it in some circles) but rather because of the challenges faced by women. As an early career woman researcher, … Continue reading → Read the full article.
  • via Alice Plane from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 3 days ago

    Harvesting polar bears for subsistence is possible without compounding the negative effects of climate change, says a new study published today in Journal of Applied Ecology. Scientists at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Geological Survey and University of Washington reached this conclusion based on a new model of how polar bear populations work. “The goal was to better understand harvest within the context of habitat loss,” said Dr. Eric Regehr, the study’s lead author.

    “When used with accurate population data, our model is a tool that can help managers meet the needs of subsistence users while imposing little additional risk to wildlife populations.”

    Polar bears were listed as “threatened” under the U.S. Endangered Species Act in 2008 due to observed and projected loss of Arctic sea-ice habitat from climate change. Although sea-ice loss is the primary threat...

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  • via Journal of Applied Ecology from The Applied Ecologist's blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 3 days ago
    Continuing our series of blog posts for International Women’s Day, our Associate Editors discuss barriers to women entering STEM fields and what we need to do to improve gender equality. Nathalie Butt – In terms of barriers to women, there are some fairly subtle ones, such as the general feeling that it is better to […] Read the full article.
  • via freshwaterblog from The BioFresh blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 4 days ago

    In a week’s time, people across the globe will get together to celebrate the world’s rivers, and those who struggle to conserve and restore them. The International Day of Action for Rivers, held each year on the 14th March, is organised by the NGO International Rivers, and provides a focus for communities across the world to organise events celebrating their rivers, and highlighting the threats they face.

    The International Day of Action for Rivers was originally adopted by the participants of the first International Meeting of People Affected by Dams, March 1997 in Curitiba, Brazil. Now a global event, the day is described by International Rivers as a focus to “raise our voices in unison against destructive water development projects, reclaim the...

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  • via Brian McGill from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 4 days ago

    I am currently attending a Festschrift this week for Michael Rosenzweig. Make no mistake, he is still actively doing science, but with 50+ years of scientific career, it seems like a good time to reflect on what an impressive career he has had. Just for full disclosure upfront, he was my PhD adviser, so I’m hardly the most unbiased reporter, but of course that gives me a close perspective.

    Mike was awarded the Ecological Society of America’s Eminent Ecologist award in 2008 and he has well over 100 papers, many massively cited, and three books, so I imagine many are familiar with his published work, and it would take too much space to summarize it anyway. I want to offer several more reflective and in some cases more personal thoughts. Take them as a reflection of my respect and appreciation for Mike or my musings on the ingredients of a good scientific career as you wish.

    If you think of a...

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  • via Chris Grieves from methods.blog (Methods in Ecology and Evolution)
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 4 days ago
    Post provided by Will Pearse I can’t think of a more inspirational and influential ecologist than Rachel Carson. Nearly fifty years ago she released a book called Silent Spring, which argued that pesticides such as DDT were cascading up through … Continue reading → Read the full article.

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