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EcoBloggers


EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via James Ross from Journal of Ecology blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 weeks ago
    Nutrient-poor grasslands cover a substantial portion of the terrestrial surface and provide important ecosystem services ranging from forage and livestock production to stabilization of erosion-prone soils. The future of these grasslands under increased drought frequency and severity is difficult to predict, especially given the complex ecological interactions and feedbacks among plants, other organisms, and physical… Read the full article.
  • via James Ross from Journal of Ecology blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 weeks ago
    Volume 105 Issue 4 of Journal of Ecology is now online! The July 2017 issue of Journal of Ecology includes a special feature titled; Ecological solutions to global food security. Edited by David Gibson and Richard Bardgett, this special feature considers the ways that plant ecologists can help meet the challenges of food production and… Read the full article.
  • via Journal of Applied Ecology from The Applied Ecologist's blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 weeks ago
    Following her recent paper in the Journal of Applied Ecology, ‘Remnant vegetation, plantings and fences are beneficial for reptiles in agricultural landscapes’, Stephanie Pulsford explores the balancing act of supporting both agriculture and biodiversity conservation. In a recent study of reptiles in grazing landscapes we demonstrated the importance of maintaining and promoting native vegetation within agricultural […] Read the full article.
  • via Amy Everard from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 4 weeks ago

    The Peatlands Research SIG has a thriving and active research and communications community, covering all aspects of peatlands, bogs, mires, fens and a diverse range of fauna, flora and fungi.

    There are a number of positions available, providing a great opportunity to gain experience/skills in different areas, whilst being able to connect with new contacts in your field of expertise.

    We are looking individuals to fill the following roles:

    – Events Coordinator: help identify and organise collaborative meetings and workshops relevant to the field of expertise and provide support at these events.

    – An Early Career rep & Student rep: help encourage and support young researchers as a growing network of people interested in Peatlands Research.

    – Publicity/Social Media...

    Read the full article.
  • via Joe Drake from The Secret Life of a Field Biologist
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 4 weeks ago
    Welcome aboard everyone! I hope you enjoy the next 2 months of post here and on Twitter ( handle is @VAN_DLL ). If you are already following, you know I am a field biologist, if you just started following, now … Continue reading → Read the full article.
  • from Nature's Confluence
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 4 weeks ago
    Mark Schwartz ​It is now roughly 30 years since I started a project in the forests of the Apalachicola Bluffs and Ravines Reserve (TNC) as a PhD student at Florida State University. I still haven’t published a paper on this particular portion of my dissertation. The irony is that remains my intention to write such a paper. Bottom line: I wrote a crappy dissertation. I appreciate all the help I got in graduate school. I worked with some truly great people who helped me enormously. Nevertheless, I look back and think that rather than being fueled by my graduate education, I survived my youthful naivete. Now that I have been a professor for more than a quarter century, I feel I have a perspective on what is a good approach to graduate studies and what is not. I also know that, like myself, most students do not indulge in enough critical thinking about their own graduate studies. Hence, below is some... Read the full article.
  • via Manu Saunders from Ecology is Not a Dirty Word
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 4 weeks ago
    A recent blog post by Andrew Kurjata asks some questions that many people have considered. Why does Twitter’s explanation of the sort of people who can be ‘verified’ not include scientists or knowledge brokers? Are politicians, singers and actors more… Read the full article.
  • via jeffollerton from Jeff Ollerton
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 7 hours ago

    Today I’ve been cracking on with the refurbishment of the old summer house at the back of the garden that previous owners have let fall into rotten disrepair, whilst Karin attends a conference in London.  The renovation has been a slow job, due to lack of time, but a lot of fun, and a good excuse to play with power tools.  In between sawing and drilling, however, I’ve been keeping an eye out for bees and other flower visitors and was delighted to spot a new species for the garden – the Ashy Mining Bee (Andrena cineraria).  It’s a beautiful and distinctive insect that I know from other sites in Northampton, but had not recorded here previously.  The record has been submitted to the BWARS recording scheme for this species...

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  • via CJAB from Conservation Bytes
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 9 hours ago
    While I’m in transit (yet a-bloody-gain) to Helsinki, I wanted to take this opportunity to reflect on one of the most inspiring eco-tourism experiences I recently had in South Australia. If you are South Australian and have even the slightest interest in wildlife, you will have of course at least heard of the awe-inspiring mass […] ... Read the full article.
  • via WildlifeSNPits from WildlifeSNPits
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 1 day ago

    Ectotherms and Climate Change
    Ectotherms regulate their body temperature using external heat sources; for example, turtles bask in the sun or on hot rocks to warm up, then retreat to the shade when they become over heated.  Increasing temperatures due to climate change are expected to have physiological effects on animals and plants.  Heat shock proteins are molecular chaperones which assist in protein synthesis and folding, particularly when a cell is stressed (ex- very hot temperatures).  This paper (sub) experimentally manipulated the incubation temperature of loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) embryos, then generated transcriptomes of the brain.  The researchers...

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