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EcoBloggers


EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via Journal of Applied Ecology from The Applied Ecologist's blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 4 days ago
    Wednesday 8 March 2017 is International Women’s Day, a global day to celebrate the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women. The theme for this year’s International Women’s Day is #BeBoldForChange. This recognises the need to challenge bias and inequality, celebrate women’s achievements, champion women’s education and more. From encouraging more girls into STEM […] Read the full article.
  • via fishthinkers from fish thinkers
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 4 days ago
    Voting is now open for the Fly Life Magazine‘s photo competition and all of the finalists have some cracking entries. Big congrats to our mate Angus Kennedy for reaching the finals with his shot of Matt guiding his canoe down the rapids of a remote south coast Bass stream. Please give him your vote to help […] Read the full article.
  • via Meghan Duffy from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 5 days ago

    Based on my interest in authorship practices in ecology, I decided to look at papers published in Ecology in each of the past seven decades to see how corresponding authorship changed over that time.* I looked at the first (or second**) issue of Ecology in 1956 and every ten years thereafter.

    tl:dr version of the results: Not surprisingly, the number of authors increased over time. For corresponding authorship, I found that, in 1996 and earlier, the corresponding author was almost never indicated. Looking every 5 years from 2001-2016, the first author*** was usually the corresponding author, though expanding the analysis to include AmNat and Evolution**** suggests that some of the changes might be due to some of the more mundane...

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  • via Terry McGlynn from Small Pond Science
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 5 days ago

    A couple months ago, a discovery was in the news: A “new human organ.” Oddly enough, I was already familiar with it, just a little bit.

    In grad school, I taught a couple human anatomy lab sections. It was pretty much a disaster for me, considering my training focused on the ecology and evolution of ants.

    The lab that I was teaching had four cadavers. As TAs, we kept ahead of the students by participating in dissections just days ahead of the students, getting to new systems and new details as the semester progressed. This was the first chance I had the chance to look at the insides of people in detail, and it was really amazing, and there were lots of...

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  • via Chris Grieves from methods.blog (Methods in Ecology and Evolution)
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 5 days ago
    Post provided by Katherine Baldock and Luísa G. Carvalheiro Ecological networks represent interactions between different biotic units in an ecosystem and are becoming an increasingly popular tool for describing and illustrating a range of different types of ecological interactions. Food … Continue reading → Read the full article.
  • via CJAB from Conservation Bytes
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 5 days ago
    If you live in South Australia, and in Adelaide especially, you would have had to be living under a rock not to have heard of the Great Koala Counts 1 and 2. So I’m not really writing this for those sotto pietra types. If you are a regular reader of CB.com, you’ll also know that I’ve […] ... Read the full article.
  • via jeffollerton from Jeff Ollerton
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 weeks 6 days ago
  • via Anna MacDonald from WildlifeSNPits
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 weeks 1 hour ago

    I’ve now been living in Australia for almost 18 years, and I’m an unashamed convert to #TeamMarsupial. Marsupials are fascinating animals in both evolutionary and ecological terms, but at times I am surprised by how poorly-understood they are. I’ve been thinking of writing a post to address some recurring marsupial misconceptions for a while. When I saw how many marsupials were in the lineup for this year’s Mammal March Madness (more on this below) I decided that the time was right! So here we have it: eight things you might not know about marsupials, and profiles of the eight amazing marsupial species featured in Mammal March Madness 2017:

    Eight things about marsupials… 1. Marsupials are mammals
    2. Platypus and echidnas are also mammals, but they are not marsupials

    Taxonomists group organisms together at...

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  • via Manu Saunders from Ecology is Not a Dirty Word
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 weeks 12 hours ago
    Stories build a relationship between subject and audience that is deeply emotional and personal. Art can enhance the audience’s nature connection, and stories about natural systems and wildlife can determine how the reader connects with those systems. This is particularly… Read the full article.
  • via ebach from Beneath Our Feet: the GSBI Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 weeks 1 day ago



    Categorisation of farmers’ knowledge of soil
    biota, based on the ‘knowledge-practice-belief’
    complex in ethnoecology. From Pauli et al. 2016

    By Natasha Pauli, Lecturer in Geography in the UWA School of Agriculture and Environment, University of Western Australia

     

    The 2016 publication of the Global Soil Biodiversity Atlas presented a compelling depiction of soil biology to a wide audience. The need for the Atlas is reflected in the fact that soil biodiversity is undervalued by society, and rarely considered within policy frameworks to protect either soil quality or biodiversity. However, this relative lack of interest in soil biological health does not hold true across all segments of society. If you were to go and ask someone who makes their living from the land what they know about soil health and soil...

    Read the full article.

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