You are here

EcoBloggers


EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 1 day ago

    Also this week: the pros and cons of axing the DDIG program, NIH vs. shopkeeper science, and more.

    From Meghan:

    This is brilliant. I think I’d give them a grant based on this alone:

    IT upgraded our computer so now the mouse has to keep moving so it doesn't go into sleep mode during the run. #LabHack pic.twitter.com/PNcVbwtKha

    — Karine (@KarineReiter1) June 9, 2017

    From Jeremy:

    Terry McGlynn with a useful summary of the arguments for and against NSF’s axing of the DDIG program.

    NIH has...

    Read the full article.
  • via James Ross from Journal of Ecology blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 1 day ago
    Public University of Navarre press release: Mixed Scots pine and beech forests can grow more as they complement each other in the use of resources, unless rainfall is low In an article published in Journal of Ecology, researchers from the NUP/UPNA-Public University of Navarre and the CSIC (Spanish National Research Council) have analysed the two… Read the full article.
  • via Chris Grieves from methods.blog (Methods in Ecology and Evolution)
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 1 day ago
    Post provided by Michael Morrissey Evolutionary quantitative genetics provides formal theoretical frameworks for quantitatively linking natural selection, genetic variation, and the rate and direction of adaptive evolution. This strong theoretical foundation has been key to guiding empirical work for a … Continue reading → Read the full article.
  • via freshwaterblog from The BioFresh blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 1 day ago
    16318675888_4b5b49a599_k

    Coffee beans. Image: Shunichi Kouroki | Flickr Creative Commons

    A cup (or two) of coffee is a regular start to the day for many people. However, new research from the USA suggests that America’s caffeine habit may be contributing new stresses to the country’s aquatic ecosystems.

    Our bodies don’t absorb all of the caffeine – the stimulant that can give us a pleasing ‘pep up’ – present in coffee, tea and many soft drinks, and as a result some caffeine is expelled in urine and faeces. Generally, sewage treatment plants remove a large proportion of caffeine from wastewater.

    However, a long-term study in San Diego, USA, has found caffeine in remote streams far...

    Read the full article.
  • via Camilla Morrison-Bell from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 1 day ago

    On Thursday 25 May I travelled from Cornwall to London to attend the first ever BES/ZSL one day workshop on “Engaging with Parliament and Responding to Inquiries”. In my view, this workshop was timely as Brexit, whether we agree with it or not, will reassess environmental legislation. The moment to engage is now; and as the snap election was not on the cards when I registered, the workshop was even more interesting!

    The day started with opening talks about what Parliament is and how it works, given by Ben Connor, our own BES Policy Manager. In this brief talk we were told the difference between parliament and government and the structure and function of parliament. We were also introduced to how the parliament scrutinises the government and debates issues, for example via Select Committees. We were also told about...

    Read the full article.
  • via Adrian Paterson from EcoLincNZ
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 1 day ago

    OK I must confess that I have become a bit of a Kickstarter junkie. This is a crowd-funding site where people put up ideas and the public puts in pledges to help fund them. Typically, there are stretch goals which add more rewards to the backers when pledges reach certain levels of funding.

    You can certainly waste a lot of time looking at the various projects. Also, if you back a project that goes crazy then you can get a lot of...

    Read the full article.
  • via colindonihue from Colin Donihue
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 2 days ago

    Greece came and went this year faster than it ever has before. I think it had to do with the fact that it was the third of my field expeditions this spring. Maybe it had something to do with the only three days at home between returning from the Bahamas and leaving for Athens. Much of my time in Greece was spent breathless trying to get from island to island and now, in retrospect, the three weeks of fieldwork seem like a bit of a hazy dream.

    Luckily I’ve got a big stack of data sheets to remember the lizards by.

    The goal this year was to revisit the island introduction experiment I started in 2014. This is year three and the first year where all of the lizards we originally introduced to the island have likely died of old age. This means that most of the lizards we were catching were the grandkids of the original colonists and had never experienced any environment other than the little islands they were born on. This is terrific for our ability to start asking...

    Read the full article.
  • via noreply@blogger.com (David Steen) from Living Alongside Wildlife
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 2 days ago
          I’m a science writer and cartoonist, and I’m passionate about snakes. When Dr. David Steen asked me to collaborate on a comic about cottonmouths, I jumped at the chance. Through my work, I love sharing snake facts, including the difference between “venomous” and “poisonous” species (hint: only a few special types are poisonous). I also enjoy celebrating cool behaviors, such as
  • via amandajmorrisoncsu from NREL EcoPress
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 2 days ago

    This summary includes publications first published online and/or in print during May 2017. If a publication was missed for this period, please contact Amanda Morrison at amanda.j.morrison@colostate.edu.

    In Print:

    Nguyen, T. H., Williams, S., & Paustian, K. (2017). Impact of ecosystem carbon stock change on greenhouse gas emissions and carbon payback periods of cassava-based ethanol in Vietnam. Biomass and Bioenergy, 100, 126-137.

     

     


    ... Read the full article.
  • via Benjamin Blonder from Natural Curiosities
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 2 days ago

    We are setting up a new forest dynamics plot in the Rocky Mountains this week, focused on understanding interactions and climate change responses among clones of quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides). The site will ultimately join the Global Ecosystems Monitoring network and contribute unique data from a low-diversity temperate forest in the coming years.

    ...

    Read the full article.

Pages

Powered by Drupal | Theme modified by Naupaka Zimmerman from Danland by Danetsoft | | INNGE is supported through a collaboration with INTECOL