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EcoBloggers


EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via Chris Grieves from methods.blog (Methods in Ecology and Evolution)
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 2 days ago
    Below is a press release about the Methods paper ‘Attributing changes in the distribution of species abundance to weather variables using the example of British breeding birds‘ taken from the University of St Andrews. Britain’s smallest bird species, the goldcrest, is being … Continue reading → Read the full article.
  • via Karen Devine from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 2 days ago

    They will make the mammoth road trip to the UK’s most iconic music festival, accompanied by bees, dung beetles, worms and ladybirds, where they will set up shop to talk to the festival-going public about the Hidden Wonders of Woodlands.

    The ‘Sex & Bugs & Rock ‘n Roll’ road show was dreamed up by researchers at Lancaster University and championed by the British Ecological Society as a way of bringing science to the public, sharing ideas and information and putting a human face to research.

    Over the years, thousands of festival-goers have encountered some of the intriguing ecology showcased in their pop-up science tent from moths with rock star names to glow-in-the-dark wormeries providing a glimpse of life below ground.

    And this year’s theme, ‘The Hidden Wonders of Woodlands’ will give people the chance to see woods in a new light. From 21st June, visitors will be able to discover unusual woodland ladybirds and astonishing fungi while playing some...

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  • via Journal of Applied Ecology from The Applied Ecologist's blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 2 days ago
    The Spotlight for issue 54:3 is on wildlife diseases. This post is written by Samantha Rumschlag and Jeremy Cohen. All five Spotlight papers are available to read here. In an ever-changing world, the risk of disease emergence is on the rise. As the climate warms, ranges of parasites and disease vectors are predicted to shift, exposing […] Read the full article.
  • via Meghan Duffy from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 3 days ago

    Today we have a guest post from Richard Primack of Boston University. Last week, I did a poll asking whether readers had used a professional editor for a grant proposal or manuscript, based on a Nature News piece that quoted Richard as saying, “I hire professional editors to help me polish my articles, grant proposals and reports.” he says. “I can do this myself, but it’s more efficient for me to pay someone to help.” I was surprised by that, since it never occurred to me to use a professional editor. The poll suggests I was not alone. 62% of respondents said they’d never used a professional editor for a manuscript because it had never occurred to them; 67% said it never occurred to them for a grant proposal and 68% for their dissertation. In this guest post,...

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  • via Chris Grieves from methods.blog (Methods in Ecology and Evolution)
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 3 days ago
    The British Ecological Society is currently working on a Guide to Reproducible Code. This will follow on from our previous Guides to Peer Review, Data Management and Getting Published. All of our Guides are intended to provide Early Career Researchers … Continue reading → Read the full article.
  • via James Ross from Journal of Ecology blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 4 days ago
    Journal of Ecology Associate Editors Jane Catford and Rob Salguero-Gómez were both keynote speakers at this year’s PopBio conference. Here is their report… A few weeks ago, we had the privilege of attending PopBio2017 in Halle, Germany. This was the 30th annual conference of the Plant Population Biology Section of the Ecological Society of Germany, Austria… Read the full article.
  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 4 days ago

    What’s the optimal composition of a graduate supervisory committee? I’m not sure. But here are some thoughts, please share yours.

    It’s essential that all your committee members be decent, reasonable people who get along with one another and with you. You don’t want to get caught in the crossfire of fights between your committee members. And you don’t want your progress to be made unnecessarily difficult because one of your committee members has unreasonable expectations.

    Beyond that, I think the ideal committee has a diversity of expertise and interests, and includes at least one smart generalist who doesn’t necessarily do anything directly relevant to the thesis. Anecdotally, I think students tend to overrate the importance of having committee members with specialized expertise directly relevant to their thesis research, and underrate the value of smart generalists. Your committee’s most important role is not to help...

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  • via James Ross from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 4 days ago

    “Lianas are well known as rivals of trees in tropical forests because lianas compete with trees for sunlight; until this study, however, we didn’t know to what extent lianas actually reduce tropical tree reproduction,” says Stefan Schnitzer, research associate at STRI and Mellon distinguished professor of biology at Marquette University.

    Lianas climb up tree trunks into the sunlit forest canopy, where they spread their leaves and reduce the light available to the very trees that support them. Lianas have a competitive advantage compared to trees because they do not invest as much energy in making large stems to support themselves — instead they use the architecture of their host trees. Rooted in the soil, lianas also compete with their host trees for water, nutrients and other belowground resources.

    Schnitzer’s team works in Panama at...

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  • via James Ross from Journal of Ecology blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 4 days ago
    Press release from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute Woody vines, known as lianas, compete intensely with trees and their numbers are on the rise in many tropical forests around the world. A new study, published in Journal of Ecology, from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama shows that lianas prevent canopy trees from… Read the full article.
  • from Nature's Confluence
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 4 days ago
    Mark Schwartz ​Approaching 8 billion people, it has never been more apparent that environmental management requires difficult discussions about this tension between individual freedom (e.g., to exploit) and societal interests (e.g., to protect). Population growth has meant that nearly all decisions in the environment are contested in this crowded world where people are everywhere, exploiting everything. I suppose that it is inevitable that conservation groups look around and see population growth as the root of the problem, and the key to long-term solutions.
    A more nuanced view of the fundamental drivers of environmental degradation looks at resource use, human footprints and income disparity as a core root of the problem. The earth would be able to support 8 billion people much more readily if a couple billion of us (with wealth) lived more like the rest (who lack wealth). This leads to consideration of life choices and an emphasis on the individual choice to leave... Read the full article.

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