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EcoBloggers


EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 4 days ago

    Note from Jeremy: This is a guest post from Greg Crowther.

    ***********************

    Previously I have whined about the difficulties of getting a good, stable college teaching job.  This whining is perhaps justified by the extremely low supply of these jobs relative to the demand.  But since almost everyone, including me, likes happy endings, I now wish to present a happy ending.  That’s right – I have received and accepted an offer for an ongoing full-time position.  At the age of 44, I have finally climbed aboard the tenure track.

    It is tempting to tell this story as, “after my past job-search failures, I learned lessons X, Y, and Z...

    Read the full article.
  • via NS from Euan Ritchie
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 4 days ago

    By Thomas Newsome (Deakin University)

    Dingoes could be the key to controlling red foxes and other invasive predators, but only if we encourage them in large enough numbers over a wide enough area, our research shows.

    ... Read the full article.
  • via Chris Grieves from methods.blog (Methods in Ecology and Evolution)
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 4 days ago
    Following on from last week’s press release ‘How Clean are Finnish Rivers?’, Vasco Elbrecht et al. have produced a video to explain the methods in ‘Assessing strengths and weaknesses of DNA metabarcoding-based macroinvertebrate identification for routine stream monitoring‘. In this … Continue reading → Read the full article.
  • via James Ross from Journal of Ecology blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 4 days ago
    State University of New York at Geneseo Press Release A new study published in Journal of Ecology examines the spread of mistletoe – a parasitic plant – and finds that the plant’s success is determined not only by its compatibility with a host tree but also whether or not the plants’ fruiting seasons overlap. Knowing… Read the full article.
  • via James Ross from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 4 days ago

    “We wanted to address an ongoing debate about the multiple determinants in the spread of parasitic plants,” says Suann Yang, assistant professor of biology at SUNY Geneseo and co-author of the study published in Journal of Ecology. “But the questions we address also applies to other parasitic relationships, including viruses and bacteria.”

    Yang and her collaborators, researchers at The Pennsylvania State University and the Island Ecology and Evolution Research Group (IPNA-CSIC), Spain, conducted the four-year field research project in sections of the University of Puerto Rico’s Finca Montaña, a mix of cattle pasture and forest patches.

    “For mistletoe, we found that the availability of suitable host species during germination and establishment...

    Read the full article.
  • from Nature's Confluence
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 4 days ago
    Mark Schwartz ​A primary problem with environmental conflict is that it does not elevate into the American psyche enough for most people in most places, most of the time. Surveys of environmental concerns generally place these in the top five, but never #1. Studies also show that voting for representatives usually focuses on the top 1-3 issues, and generally not their environmental positions.
     
    Thus, the large, diffuse populace of American citizens as stakeholders usually have under-represented voices; local citizens whose lives are affected by the promise of jobs or the fear of loss of quality of life are heard; and he typically small suite of financial stakeholders often get a large voice relative to what we might think appropriate. A vanishingly small number of large corporations have a large interests in outcomes and can influence outcomes when the public is not paying due diligence. A small number of local people have a large interest in the outcome. The... Read the full article.
  • via AarontheEcolog from Aaron Greenville
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 4 days ago

    Authors: Thomas M. Newsome, Aaron C. Greenville, Duško Ćirović, Chris R. Dickman, Chris N. Johnson, Miha Krofel, Mike Letnic, William J. Ripple, Euan G. Ritchie, Stoyan Stoyanov & Aaron J. Wirsing.

    Published in: Nature Communications

    Abstract:

    ... Read the full article.
  • from Rebecca Jarvis
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 4 days ago

    Our paper on a code of conduct for marine conservation is now out in Marine Policy:

    Highlights

    • Poor governance and social issues can jeopardize the legitimacy of, support for and long-term effectiveness of marine conservation.

    • A comprehensive set of social standards is needed to provide a solid platform for conservation actions.

    • This paper reviews key principles and identifies next steps in developing a code of conduct for marine conservation.

    • The objectives of a code of conduct are to promote fair, just and accountable marine conservation.

    • A code of conduct will enable marine conservation to be both socially acceptable and ecologically effective.

    ...

    Read the full article.
  • via freshwaterblog from The BioFresh blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 5 days ago
    Earth+Cast+pool+4

    New life springing from an Artecology earth-cast pool. Image: Artecology

    We’ve heard how aquatic habitat quality and connectivity is a key factor in supporting diverse and healthy ecosystems a number of times (here and here) in recent weeks.

    So when we heard about a new British company drawing from artistic and architectural practices to create unusual and beautiful constructions which act as new aquatic habitats, we were intrigued.

    We spoke to Artecology founder Ian Boyd to find out more.

    +++

    Tell us about Artecology: what do you do, and when did your work start?...

    Read the full article.
  • via Kirsty Lucas from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 5 days ago

    Neonicotinoids, including clothianidin and thiamethoxam, are a class of insecticide commonly applied as a coating to corn and soybean seeds to protect them from early-season pests. Since the coatings are sticky, a talc or graphite powder is added to vacuum systems in planters to keep the seeds from clumping. Powder exhausted from the planter contains neonicotinoids.

    The United States is losing about one-third of its honeybee hives each year, a significant problem since the bees pollinate many crops used to feed people and livestock. Neonicotinoids, which are highly toxic to honeybees, are being scrutinized as a possible contributor to the losses.

    Christian Krupke, a professor of entomology, showed in 2012 that exhausted insecticides collected on flowers that border agricultural fields and were present in hives near those fields....

    Read the full article.

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