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EcoBloggers


EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via jeffollerton from Jeff Ollerton
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 2 days ago
  • via Camilla Morrison-Bell from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
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    2 months 2 days ago

    We heard from several groups, including People Need NaturePlantlife, The Land Workers’ Alliance, The Landscape Institute, the Country Land & Business Association and ADAS

    Speakers from these organisations presented their visions for how agriculture could be transformed in a post-Brexit landscape.

    A number of options were tabled and several themes had support across the board. The need for reform of payments to prioritise public benefit (and clear communication of what public benefit means to farmers and the general public) was one. However, opinions varied on how this could be delivered. It was emphasised that environmental goals need to be taken as seriously in farming as animal welfare now...

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  • via Manu Saunders from Ecology is Not a Dirty Word
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    2 months 2 days ago
    The cultural traditions of Christmas, like every aspect of our lives, are embedded in stories of science…botany, ecology, chemistry, entomology etc. If you blog about science and nature, Christmas-themed posts can easily become an annual habit. Unfortunately, because of our… Read the full article.
  • via CJAB from Conservation Bytes
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    2 months 3 days ago
    Corals could have some unexpected allies to cope with the multi-faceted threats posed by climate change. In a new study published today in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Montano and colleagues show how tiny hydrozoans smaller than 1 mm and commonly found in dense colonies on the surface of hard corals (see above photo) […] ... Read the full article.
  • via James Ross from Journal of Ecology blog
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    2 months 3 days ago
    Cathy Pfister (University of Chicago) has recently had a paper published on kelp forests in the Northeast Pacific Ocean. She tells us more about her paper below… In the decade or so before WWI, Germany had a near monopoly on an essential resource: potash mines that supplied fertilizer (as well as gunpowder) globally. The possibility… Read the full article.
  • via Sabrina Weiss from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 3 days ago

     

    The study, which focuses on fisheries’ productivity under progressive coral reef degradation, has also found that fisheries may be fairly robust up until the initial reef degradation stages.

    However, authorities needed to change management practices to take advantage of those benefits, UQ postdoctoral research fellow Dr Alice Rogers said.

    Dr Rogers, of UQ’s Marine Spatial Ecology Lab in the School of Biological Sciences, said coral reef health around the world was deteriorating, affecting the lives of tens of millions of people.
    “The loss of living corals alters the flora and fauna found in the sea,” she said.

    “This means less refuges and places to hide for reef fish – but it also means more algae, and more invertebrates that many reef fish eat.

    “Our study used a size-based food web model of a coral reef to explore how these changes affect coral reef communities, food webs and the potential productivity of coral reef fisheries...

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  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
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    2 months 3 days ago

    Lurking on Twitter and ecoevojobs.net, I sometimes see graduate students and postdocs feeling apologetic and even guilty about asking people for lots of reference letters. They worry that they’re asking for a big favor, which will burden their current and former supervisors with a ton of unwanted extra work. And I can see where they’re coming from. Nobody likes making extra work for other people, or asking too many favors of other people.

    But speaking for myself, and for every PI I’ve spoken to about this (which obviously isn’t a census or random sample of all PIs, but isn’t a tiny sample either), let me reassure you that you don’t need to worry about this. Your request for a reference letter is not a burden, and fulfilling it is not a huge favor. It’s part of my job to write reference letters for my current and former mentees. As many letters as they want, forever. Further, I’m happy to do it, because I want my current and...

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  • via Journal of Applied Ecology from The Applied Ecologist's blog
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    2 months 3 days ago
    How is climate change affecting both black bear hibernation and our interactions with the species? Associate Editor, Claudia Bieber comments on the recent article, Human development and climate affect hibernation in a large carnivore with implications for human–carnivore conflicts by Heather Johnson et al. As we were enduring extremely high summer temperatures in Vienna, it was […] Read the full article.
  • via noreply@blogger.com (Caroline Tucker) from The EEB & Flow
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 4 days ago
    Here is this year's card, with best wishes from both of us at the EEB & Flow!

    It gets a little harder every year to figure these out. R's plotting capabilities improve every year, but usually via specialized packages. I've tried more and more to use as few additional packages beyond base, and to produce a script that is hopefully compatible across platforms.
    • For best performance, users must install the 'deldir' package and the 'RCurl' package. This lets you download the necessary data file with as little effort as possible. 
    • If you have trouble accessing the file via the URL, you can just download the data file from Github directly, making sure to load the file into R using the hashed out code in Lines6-7.
    Then to run, copy the full code (below), OR download... Read the full article.
  • via noreply@blogger.com (David Steen) from Living Alongside Wildlife
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 4 days ago
    Hi all,        Recently the Washington Post published a controversial Perspectives piece by Dr. Alex Pyron. To most readers, the piece seemed to argue that it does not matter if many species go extinct and we should not care. You can view this article here: "We don't need to save endangered species. Extinction is part of evolution".    The response to this article was swift and widespread.

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