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EcoBloggers


EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via CJAB from Conservation Bytes
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    3 months 4 weeks ago
    Seeing majestic lions strolling along the Maasai Mara at sunset — a dream vision for many conservationists, but a nightmare for pastoralists trying to keep their cattle safe at night. Fortunately a conservation success story from Kenya, published today in the journal Conservation Evidence, shows that predation of cattle can be reduced by almost 75% […] ... Read the full article.
  • via Benjamin Blonder from Natural Curiosities
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 months 4 weeks ago
  • via dinoverm from Parasite Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 months 4 weeks ago
    EEID 2017 starts this weekend, and I hope to see y’all there! As I always do, I’ll be conducting an unofficial parasite ecology cartoon contest when I watch talks – mostly for my own enjoyment, but also so that I … Continue reading → Read the full article.
  • via Sophia Winkler-Schor from EcoLincNZ
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    3 months 4 weeks ago

    Hiking the Edwards-Hawdon Route in Arthur’s Pass National Park a few weeks ago, I had my first encounter with the majestic, yet devious, kea (Nestor notabilis). While stopping to catch my breath, a curious kea hopped over to greet me. I was thrilled to see this beautiful bird for the first time; I admired its verdant, olive coloring and laughed at its inquisitive gesticulations. After taking a 100 (mostly blurry) pictures, I continued on my hike. Little did I know I would meet the kea again.

    After living off nuts and fruit for two days, I looked forward to a piping-hot basket of salty fries at Arthur’s Pass Cafe. As a US-native, I knew nothing of the kea’s notorious nature, nor that they terrorize tourists throughout the South Island, particularly...

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  • via Stephanie Schuttler from WildlifeSNPits
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    3 months 4 weeks ago

    Conservationists and other nature lovers frequently advocate to save or increase biodiversity, but what exactly is biodiversity? One conjures up images of rainforests, coral reefs or animal clipart arranged artistically. These hint at the concept of biodiversity, which on the surface, seems simple, but gets more complicated once you try to measure it (even for scientists).

    Biodiversity describes the variety of life forms and should be tied to a specific area (e.g. a site, ecosystem, or region). In most cases, species are used as “life forms,” which is why we frequently see these animal assemblages or rainforest images to accompany the word biodiversity because more species = higher biodiversity. As a fancy scientist, one of my favorite things is...

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  • via freshwaterblog from The BioFresh blog
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    3 months 4 weeks ago

    The European eel is one of the continent’s most remarkable and wide-ranging aquatic animals. Young eels (known as elvers) are born in the Sargasso Sea in the West Atlantic Ocean, and migrate back to European watercourses. Here, they mature and grow larger over a number of years, before making the journey back to the Sargasso Sea to spawn themselves.

    However, European eel populations are subject to considerable threats. Some eel populations have dropped by over 90% across the continent in recent decades, largely as the result of overfishing and habitat loss. The European eel has been designated as ‘Critically Endangered’ by the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species since 2008 as a result.

    A new community-engaged animation has sought...

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  • via ebach from Beneath Our Feet: the GSBI Blog
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    4 months 15 hours ago
    By Dietrich Epp Schmidt, Graduate Reserach Assistant, University of Maryland

    “Even the mightiest of us return to dust, they say. Nothing remains but these shattered fragments of their kingdom… But that's not really the point, is it? These shattered fragments remain- that's the point. We look upon the magnificent temples and stelae and ball courts of Caracol in awe. There's no despair here. The Maya built something astounding and permanent. Look on our works, ye mighty, and revere. The ancient Maya speak to the twenty-first century through those temples and say: We did something amazing here.

    What will our descendants think when they come upon Chalillo [dam]? When they scrape away the deep layer of dirt covering its stepping-stone facade, what will they make of the dogleg design, the Chinese gauges, the long-stopped turbines? What will they make of the skeletons and fossils of birds long gone? Will they connect the two?"

     

    -Bruce Barcott, The last...

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  • via admin from BRIT Blog
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    4 months 17 hours ago
    Our”Cabinet Curiosities” series explores significant items in our Herbarium collection. This article was written by Haley Rylander, Research and Herbarium Assistant. The New Zealand Kauri – Agathis australis – is a truly magnificent tree, revered in New Zealand by the … Continue reading → Read the full article.
  • via noreply@blogger.com (Caroline Tucker) from The EEB & Flow
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    4 months 17 hours ago
    The niche concept is a good example of an idea in ecology that is continually changing. It is probably the most important idea in ecology that no one has yet nailed down. As most histories of the niche mention, the niche has developed from its first mention by Grinnell (in 1917) to Hutchinson’s multi-dimensional niche space, to mechanistic descriptions of resource usage and R*s (from MacArthur’s warblers to Tilman’s algae). Its most recent incarnation can be found in what has been called modern coexistence theory, as first proposed by Peter Chesson in his seminal 2000 paper.

    Chesson’s mathematical framework has come to dominate a lot of discussion amongst community ecologists, with good reason. It provides a clear way to understand stable coexistence amongst local populations in terms of their ability to recover... Read the full article.
  • via Amy Padfield from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
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    4 months 22 hours ago

    Time and time again academics cite the role of mentors in helping them progress in their careers, and mentoring has been shown to be particularly formative for women. I myself am extremely lucky in that I have had brilliant mentors guiding and supporting me throughout my academic career. In some cases, I’m not sure they realised they were mentoring me, in others it is only with the wisdom of hindsight that I realised they mentored me. Thank goodness, then, there are increasing numbers of formal mentoring schemes available, not least including the BES Mentoring Scheme for Women in Ecology.

    Recognition of the importance of mentors in my own career progression, was one of the reasons that I applied for the first time to be a mentor on the scheme last summer. I wasn’t entirely sure what to expect. I think I assumed my role would mainly be advising my mentee in career progression. Possibly there would be some discussion of work-life balance. Maybe more ‘controversial’ topics such...

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