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EcoBloggers
EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via GrrlScientist from GrrlScientist
    19 hours 10 min ago
    The third installment in a children's book series that follows the adventures of twin amateur sleuths who build several science-y spy gadgets to aid them in their quest to solve a mystery.

    The summer holidays are only two weeks along but 11-year-old Nick Holt already misses his parents. In Nick and Tesla's Secret Agent Gadget Battle by Bob Pflugfelder and Steve Hockensmith [Quirk Books, 2014; Amazon UK; Amazon US/kindle US], we learn that Nick is convinced that someone is spying on his twin sister, Tesla, and him. His paranoia grows after their mother leaves them a voicemail warning of danger but before he hears who they...

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  • via Terry McGlynn from Small Pond Science
    21 hours 53 min ago

    Once in a while, tropical biologists get bot flies. We sometimes find this out while were are in the field. But on five occasions, my students have returned to the US, and then discovered that they are hosting a bot. They all contacted me for advice. I told them a few things, but the most important one was:

    Whatever you do, don’t go see a doctor. That could be disastrous.

    Nonetheless, three of these students went to the doctor.

     T. McGlynn

    A mature bot fly larva, Dermatobia hominis, that emerged from my student’s arm while he was sleeping. He intentionally reared this one out and allowed it to pupate. Pencil is for scale....

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  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    21 hours 55 min ago

    Just for fun, I just looked up our least-read posts. Some of what I found was unsurprising, but other things were kind of interesting. Any of you who are thinking of starting your own blogs might find some useful tips here as to what sort of posts people don’t want to read.

    • Unsurprisingly, announcements about the blog (e.g., “Meg’s away for a while”) don’t draw readers. Which is fine, sometimes you just need to say things for the record.
    • Our Friday linkfests drew very few readers early on. They’ve become more popular, which has convinced us to keep doing them. Plus, I find that doing them is a good source of new post ideas. But they’re still easily the least-read sort of post that we do regularly. I’m not surprised. People mostly share links via social media these days. And apparently, our brief commentary on our links doesn’t add enough value to draw many readers.
    • But even less-read than Friday...
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  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    21 hours 55 min ago

    Just for fun, I just looked up our least-read posts. Some of what I found was unsurprising, but other things were kind of interesting. Any of you who are thinking of starting your own blogs might find some useful tips here as to what sort of posts people don’t want to read.

    • Unsurprisingly, announcements about the blog (e.g., “Meg’s away for a while”) don’t draw readers. Which is fine, sometimes you just need to say things for the record.
    • Our Friday linkfests drew very few readers early on. They’ve become more popular, which has convinced us to keep doing them. Plus, I find that doing them is a good source of new post ideas. But they’re still easily the least-read sort of post that we do regularly. I’m not surprised. People mostly share links via social media these days. And apparently, our brief commentary on our links doesn’t add enough value to draw many readers.
    • But even less-read than Friday...
    Read the full article.
  • via dinoverm from Parasite Ecology
    23 hours 53 min ago
    Mutualisms are kind of a big deal.  In fact, our very existence depends on mutualisms.  From the pollinators that service our crops to the bacteria that help us digest our food, we just couldn’t survive without them. Since mutualisms are … Continue reading → Read the full article.
  • via Corey Bradshaw from Conservation Bytes
    1 day 7 hours ago
    State budget percentage expenditures for health, education and environment

    South Australia State budget percentage expenditures for health, education and environment

    Yesterday I gave the second keynote address at the South Australia Natural Resource Management (NRM) Science Conference at the University of Adelaide (see also a brief synopsis of Day 1 here). Unfortunately, I’m missing today’s talks because of an acute case of man cold, but at least I can stay at home and work while sipping hot cups of tea.

    ...

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  • via sleather2012 from Don't Forget the Roundabouts
    1 day 14 hours ago

    I have been involved in scientific journal editing since the mid-1980s when I took on the role of Editor of an in-house newsletter run by the UK Forestry Commission’s Forest Research arm, EntoPath News. This basically involved writing short articles about what was going on in Forest Research and persuading colleagues to write about their research, mainly for a lay audience. This was pretty much a home-made effort, typed up and then photocopied by members of the Typing Pool (now those were the days!). Then in 1991 I was asked if I would like to edit Antenna, the in-house journal of the Royal Entomological Society. This was a step-up – we actually had a printer, although this was in the days of cut and paste when cut and paste meant exactly that. I was sent the proofs in what were termed galleys, long sheets of printed pages, together with template pages, marked out with blue lines to indicate margins etc. I then grabbed a pair of scissors and a...

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  • via noreply@blogger.com (David Steen) from Living Alongside Wildlife
    1 day 18 hours ago
    I found this snake in my yard in Northeast Ohio. It is not aggressive at all and is prob less than 12 inches do you know what it is? I did not keep this snake I let him go. I only kept him long enough to take pictures I just want to make sure there aren't dangerous snakes around my house! Kara Ohio Readers: What is this Snake? ----- Snake Identification Post Ground Rules -Guesses
  • via Florian Hartig from Theoretical Ecology
    1 day 20 hours ago

    We are looking for candidates to fill a 3-yr postdoc position in our lab. The plan is to use Bayesian statistics to connected a process-based forest model to data, and use the fitted models to test the effect of functional diversity on ecosystem responses and community stability. Details here or via NatureJobs.


    ... Read the full article.
  • via Amy Parachnowitsch from Small Pond Science
    1 day 21 hours ago

    Spring is springing in Sweden and I’m finally out from under my grant writing load. It is pretty easy to complain about writing grants and I am not innocent in this respect. But it is also an opportunity to explore new ideas and topics. This year I decided to try at the more applied government funding agency which I haven’t attempted before.

    I generally do basic science. Sure some of my research might one day shed light on a practical problem but I’m in it trying to understand the world around me. So in previous years I haven’t felt my research fit with the more applied funding sources and didn’t want to jam a square peg into a round hole as it were. If I don’t see a real way that my research fits into a funding agencies goals then I didn’t see the point of sending something there. But this year was different because I started thinking about research questions that interested and excited me and were directly relevant to a more applied grant.

    So here’s the steps that...

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