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EcoBloggers
EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via admin from BRIT Blog
    12 hours 26 min ago
    By Will Godwin, PhD, BRIT Research Associate Adaptive reuse or re-purposing has become a popular method to achieve green or sustainable design. It even extends into the aesthetics of interior design through shabby-chic and the more avant-garde, lab-chic. But reuse … Continue reading → Read the full article.
  • via Jonas Lembrechts from Biodiverse Perspectives
    12 hours 29 min ago
    Plant in its natural environment

    Photography is classified as art, ecology is science. Two distinct worlds that only very rarely show some overlap. I am however convinced that a combination of both disciplines could be very fruitful. Being a photographing ecologist, or ecological photographer not only gives artistic satisfaction, but it can also be a serious addition to your science.

    Although taking pictures on a busy fieldwork day might feel like a waste of precious time, it can be really valuable to assign some minutes in the field to photography and make sure you are familiar with at least the basic skills of the art.

    ...

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  • via downwithtime from Open Quaternary Discussions
    15 hours 46 min ago

    This post has been cross-posted from downwithtime.

     BrendelSignature at en.wikipedia

    Figure 1. Hoping we’ll find a proxy for beautiful sunsets. Image from: BrendelSignature at en.wikipedia

    Clean water, forest products, clean air.  The value of ecosystem services has received a lot of attention in the past several years. In 1997 Robert Costanza and co-authors provided one of the first real valuations of ecosystem services (Costanza et al., 1997), estimating that, at an annual subsidy of ~$33 Trillion...

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  • via downwithtime from downwithtime
    16 hours 2 min ago
     BrendelSignature at en.wikipedia

    Figure 1. Hoping we’ll find a proxy for beautiful sunsets. Image from: BrendelSignature at en.wikipedia

    Clean water, forest products, clean air.  The value of ecosystem services has received a lot of attention in the past several years. In 1997 Robert Costanza and co-authors provided one of the first real valuations of ecosystem services (Costanza et al., 1997), estimating that, at an annual subsidy of ~$33 Trillion, they provide more value to human society than the entire global GNP at the time (~$18 Trillion).  Following Costanza’s paper and the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (...

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  • via Rosemary Hartman from UC Davis Ecology Graduate Students Association
    19 hours 3 min ago

    It’s a new year, new grant cycle, time to think about everyone’s favorite topic – Data management! OK, it’s probably not the most fun thing you will ever do. If you really love databases, Endnote libraries, data dictionaries, and quality assurance plans, you will have great job security later in life. However, if you are like me you started grad school with a vague proficiency in Excel and some idea that you should take good lab notes. Managing data in any organized fashion was never as fun or interesting as collecting it. I was sure to remember what I did, why I did it, and where I put it, right?

    You can get away with sloppy data management with a small project, but you should start good habits early. Even that pilot study needs a little help from the data organization cat!

    No. Not really. It is...

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  • via Terry McGlynn from Small Pond Science
    21 hours 33 min ago
    Attention education researchers: Here are some tips about interacting with science faculty. I’ve noticed that this genre uses a lot of lists. So, here’s a list:
    1. Lose the acronyms.
    2. Lose the jargon. You can use Bloom’s Taxonomy without actually calling it that. You can ask us to use formative assessments without calling them that.
    3. We’re not going to spend more time on new approaches to teaching, unless this new thing will save us more time down the road.
    4. Our fundamental attitudes towards students and the educational system are unlikely to change.
    5. Some scientists just don’t place their students first. Those are the ones you really need to reach. Don’t judge us as a group because that judgment can’t fix the problem.
    6. Don’t prescribe changes in curriculum.
    7. If you say it works, then show us data. Anecdotes are subject to suspicion.
    8. Data are also subject to scrutiny, too. You win...
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  • via will.pearse from Phylo-Eco-Geo-Evo Journal Club
    21 hours 38 min ago

    Poisot, Stouffer, & Gravel. bioRxiv DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/001677. Beyond species: why ecological interaction networks vary through space and time

    An interaction network based around populations (left) may not look at the same as one based around species (right). Species may sometimes interact with one-another, but that doesn’t mean that they always have to. Figure 1 in Poisot et al.

    ... Read the full article.
  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    21 hours 41 min ago

    Katie Koelle delivered the opening talk in the Ignite session on “theory vs. empiricism” at the ESA meeting.* I thought she raised several interesting issues that weren’t really touched on in the rest of the session. I was struck by one remark in particular: that theory in ecology is dying, or at least going out of fashion, and is being replaced by modeling.

    Theory here means trying to discover or derive general principles or laws–the fundamental simplicity underlying and unifying the apparent polyglot complexity of nature. Think of evolution by natural selection, the laws of thermodynamics, general relativity, MaxEnt, and statistical “attractors” like the central limit theorem and extreme value theory.

    In contrast, modeling here means building a mathematical description of some specific system, in order...

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  • via Euan Ritchie from Euan Ritchie
    23 hours 36 min ago

    Authors Keith Bradby, James A Fitzsimons, Andrew Del Marco, Don A Driscoll, Euan G Ritchie, Jenny Lau, Corey JA Bradshaw and Richard J Hobbs

    Abstract

    Western Australia’s State Barrier Fence represents a continuation of colonial era attitudes that considered kangaroos, emus and dingoes as vermin.

    Recent plans to upgrade and extend the Barrier Fence have shown little regard for ecological impacts or statutory environmental assessment processes.

    EmusAtBarreirFence

    Emus are known to travel up to 1000 kilometres between seasons. This is what happens when their migration is impeded by the West Australian State Barrier Fence. Image credit : Graeme Chapman.

    Bradby K, Fitzsimons JA, Del...

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  • via Samantha Ponton from methods.blog (Methods in Ecology and Evolution)
    23 hours 37 min ago
    Issue 5.9 is now available online, including articles on telemetry and sensors, markers and sequences, modelling and model assessment, and extending current data. In addition there are 2 freely available applications: MeCa, a toolbox for the calculation of metabolism in … Continue reading → Read the full article.

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